John Tudor, Jr. – Greenville, Pitts, North Carolina


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John Tudor Jr. 

Birth: 1720

Isle of Wight, Isle of Wight, Virginia, United States

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Image result for Isle of Wight, Isle of Wight, Virginia, United States

First Marriage: about 1748 Brunswick County, Virginia to Elizabeth Fraser
Second Marriage: about 1761 in Granville County, North Carolina to Elizabeth Seymour White
Third Marriage: before 1764 in Brunswick County, Virginia to Frances Phillips
 
Death

 

Granville County, North Carolina
Granville County is a county located in the U.S. state of North Carolina. As of the 2010 census, the population was 59,916. Its county seat is Oxford. Wikipedia
Burial: 
Non-Cemetery Burial Created by: Terri T 
Record added: Mar 20, 2016 
Find A Grave Memorial# 159792522

“JOHN TUDOR, SR. b. ca. 1695; d. ca. 1721. (A very young man). Little is known about John Tudor, SR. d. intestate 1771 in Surry Co., VA.. Inventory of his estate was filed under JOHN TEDDER in Surry Co., VA.. He left a widow named Mary and 2 young sons- Benjamin Tudor, and John Tudor, JR.

It is known that the widow Mary m2. to the co-administrator of the estate, Henry Rose, some months prior to the filing of the Inventory 1 Ap. 1721. Proof that he left 2 young sons comes from the Deeds & Estate records of Henry Rose, when he explains the relationship to his wife Mary, and refers to them as step-sons when he deeded land to them. John Tudor, SR. had modest household furnishings, some pewter, a Bible, and a Book of Common Prayer (suggesting a link to the Church of England), and shoemaker’s tools along with a ‘parcel of leather. (suggesting he had been a shoemaker by trade).

JOHN TUDOR JR. was b. ca 1720 ; d. 1782 Granville Co., N. C.. It is highly probable that he was born in VA.. He was born no later than 1720 and could have been born a few years earlier. It is believed that he spent his ‘growing up’ years in the Isle of Wight Co., VA.. The first record that we have of John Tudor, JR., is a deed to him from his step-father, Henry Rose, in Brunswick Vo., VA., dated 7 June, 1750, which states that both men were living in Brunswick Vo., VA.. Henry Rose deeded the remainder of the 342 acre tract of land in Brunswick Co., VA., but reserved interest for himself and his wife, Mary, to reside on the tract. Henry Rose died about 1752 and John Tudor, JR., remained in Brunswick Co., VA., until 1764, when he moved to Granville Co., N.C., with his own family and other TUDOR relatives. John Tudor, JR. m 1st Elizabeth [nee ???] 1749-69. There is no evidence to tell us what her maiden name was. There is evidence that she died before 1762. . and John Tudor, JR., married another Elizabeth. There is evidence that she was a daughter of Valentine White, and OUR TUDOR LINE traces to this Elizabeth. The 2nd Elizabeth was the mother of BLUMER TUDOR, our ancestor.

The children of John Tudor, JR., were: A. Phoebe Tudor, b, ca, 1750; m. John Morris. B. Henry Tudor, b. ca. 1752; d. by 1782; m. Nancy, C. John Tudor III, b. 1754, had a R/W pension. A R/W soldier who went to Madison Co., KY..

He m. 1st 1779 in Granville Co., N.C.; to Martha Search. He m. 2nd to Frances Phillips, m 3rd to Elizabeth White. These were the children of his 1st wife.

Children of his 2nd wife were: D. Valentine Tudor, b. 1764; m. Granville Co., N.C., to Elizabeth Hicks. Valentine Tudor had a R/W pension. E. Tabitha Tudor, b. 1766, m. 1784 Granville Co., N.C., to Pleasant Whitlow. F. Winefred Tudor, b. ca. 1769; m. James Long. G. BLUMER TUDOR, (our ancestor), b. 1770-72 Granville Co., N.C.; m. 21 May, 1795 in Madison Co., KY. to CHARITY TURNER. (more later). H. Daniel Tudor, b. 1774; m. Nancy Moberly. I. Anne Tudor, b. ca. 1777, m. Samuel Moberly.

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Madison County, Kentucky

During the migration in 1785-1787, the widow Elizabeth took her 6 youngest children to Madison Co., KY., with her eldest son Valentine & his family. There is evidence that some of her older children joined her there. She died in Madison Co., KY., amongst her children.”

source: 9 September 2015 by ColeScottCameron1

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John Tudor, Sr. – Denbigh, Clwyd, Wales


denbighshire-denbigh-crown-square-c1950s

denbigh-wales_castle

John Tudor, Sr.

Born: 1684 in Denbigh, Clwyd, Wales, United Kingdom.

Died: 1721 in Surry County, Virginia.

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Eastover Manor House on the James- 1800’s Plantation Home

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Married: 1717 to Mary Seat (aka Seate) in Isle of Wight, Virginia.

Children: John Jr. and Benjamin Tudor. 

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Surry County, Virginia is a county located in the Commonwealth of Virginia. Its county seat is Surry. In 1652, Surry County was formed from the portion of James City County south of the James River.Wikipedia

Image result for Surry Co., VA

“JOHN TUDOR, SR. b. ca. 1695; d. ca. 1721. (A very young man). Little is known about John Tudor, SR. d. intestate 1771 in Surry Co., VA.. Inventory of his estate was filed under JOHN TEDDER in Surry Co., VA.. He left a widow named Mary and 2 young sons- Benjamin Tudor, and John Tudor, Jr. It is known that the widow Mary m2. to the co-administrator of the estate, Henry Rose, some months prior to the filing of the Inventory 1 Ap. 1721. Proof that he left 2 young sons comes from the Deeds & Estate records of Henry Rose, when he explains the relationship to his wife Mary, and refers to them as step-sons when he deeded land to them. John Tudor, SR. had modest household furnishings, some pewter, a Bible, and a Book of Common Prayer (suggesting a link to the Church of England), and shoemaker’s tools along with a ‘parcel of leather. (suggesting he had been a shoemaker by trade).

JOHN TUDOR JR. was b. ca 1720 ; d. 1782 Granville Co., N. C.. It is highly probable that he was born in VA.. He was born no later than 1720 and could have been born a few years earlier. It is believed that he spent his ‘growing up’ years in the Isle of Wight Co., VA. The first record that we have of John Tudor, JR., is a deed to him from his step-father, Henry Rose, in Brunswick, VA, dated 7 June, 1750, which states that both men were living in Brunswick, VA. 

Henry Rose deeded the remainder of the 342 acre tract of land in Brunswick, VA. but reserved interest for himself and his wife, Mary, to reside on the tract. Henry Rose died about 1752 and John Tudor, JR., remained in Brunswick Co., VA., until 1764, when he moved to Granville Co., N.C., with his own family and other TUDOR relatives. John Tudor, JR. m 1st Elizabeth [nee ???] 1749-69. There is no evidence to tell us what her maiden name was. There is evidence that she died before 1762. . and John Tudor, JR., married another Elizabeth Seymour White. There is evidence that she was a daughter of Valentine White, and OUR TUDOR LINE traces to this Elizabeth. The 2nd Elizabeth was the mother of BLUMER TUDOR, our ancestor.

The children of John Tudor, JR., were: A. Phoebe Tudor, b, ca, 1750; m. John Morris. B. Henry Tudor, b. ca. 1752; d. by 1782; m. Nancy, C. John Tudor III, b. 1754, had a R/W pension. A R/W soldier who went to Madison Co., KY..

He m. 1st 1779 in Granville, N.C.; to Martha Search. He m. 2nd to Frances Phillips, m 3rd to Elizabeth White. These were the children of his 1st wife.

Children of his 2nd wife were: D. Valentine Tudor, b. 1764; m. Granville Co., N.C., to Elizabeth Hicks. Valentine Tudor had a R/W pension. E. Tabitha Tudor, b. 1766, m. 1784 Granville Co., N.C., to Pleasant Whitlow. F. Winifred Tudor, b. ca. 1769; m. James Long. G. BLUMER TUDOR, (our ancestor), b. 1770-72 Granville Co., N.C.; m. 21 May, 1795 in Madison Co., KY. to CHARITY TURNER. (more later). H. Daniel Tudor, b. 1774; m. Nancy Moberly. I. Anne Tudor, b. ca. 1777, m. Samuel Moberly. During the migration in 1785-1787, the widow Elizabeth took her 6 youngest children to Madison Co., KY., with her eldest son Valentine & his family. There is evidence that some of her older children joined her there. She died in Madison Co., KY., amongst her children.”

source: 9 September 2015 by ColeScottCameron1, FamilySearch.org Website

 

 

 

England Travel: Oxford


NJ to the World

If London was a shining beacon of adventure and excitement, relatively Oxford was much more of a disappointment. I think this is true, for me, because I had a explicitly detailed, vivid preconceived notion of what I expected Oxford to be like. Like most college-aged, study abroad, American tourists in Europe, I had to hit one of England’s prestigious schools (those being Cambridge or Oxford: Oxbridge). I happened to choose Oxford, mainly because it’s one of the oldest and highest ranked universities in the world, partially because they filmed bits of Harry Potter there. Needless to say, it did not match what I had expected. But, if Oxford was not good for anything else, it was good for one thing: it got me out of London to see some of the rest of the country of England. I really wish I could have seen more of the English countryside. But Oxford…

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England Travel: London


NJ to the World

While many of my trips in Europe brought me to some of the world’s finest cities, I think it is fair to say that London was the most impressive. Maybe it was because my expectations were not set extremely high (I had been told for some time that London was essentially “New York, but everything is double the price because of the pound system”). While London and New York City share many commonalities– both are bustling metropolises and world leaders in finance– I found there was much about London that made it incredibly distinctive. London is full of history and culture that are unique to the city and the country of England. The red Double-Decker buses, the iconic red phone booths, the street performers, and London’s deep-rooted history were all something of a wonder. Not to mention, the city possessed one of the best transportation systems I have ever experienced…

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Donald Wayne Tudor~~~Veteran of World War II~~~Stephenville, Erath County, Texas


Texas Tudor's Memorials

English: Erath County Courthouse, Stephenville...

Donald Wayne Tudor
Birth: Dec. 9, 1927
Stephenville
Erath County
Texas, USA
Death: Apr. 16, 2012
Uvalde
Uvalde County
Texas, USA

Parents: Sol Ross “Conrad” Tudor & Bergie Mae (Mobley) Tudor of Stephenville, Texas.
His brothers, Leonard Doyle, & Raymond Horton Tudor preceded him in death.His sister, Mae Corrine Tudor (Williams) also preceded him in death.Grandparents: Thomas Benton “T.B.” Tudor & Sallie Hampton (Keith) Tudor of Tippah County, Mississippi.Great Grandparents: Jesse Gee Tudor & Eliza Jane Boone Cutbirth Tudor of Tennessee.
Married: Annie Mae (McCann) 11 May 1955 in Stephenville, TX.
Wayne was a proud World War II veteran of Air Force.

Children: Leonard “Len” Ross, Anita Corrine “Nita”, and Donald “Don” Raymond Tudor. Step son, Steve Morgan.
Beloved father, honorable husband, and proud Air Force Veteran of World War II. Served his community all his life. He was a unselfish person, who helped when…

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Linderman Family Genealogy~Dubuque, Iowa


705 W. Third Street, Dubuque, Iowa 52001

Home built by E. F. Linderman & Gudrun Ivara (Lund) Linderman

Edward Francis Linderman, 705 W. Third Street, Dubuque, Iowa

Shirley, Jimmie, Dickie, Gladys, and Edward Linderman~World War II~Dubuque, Iowa

Written by Roy Leonard “Jimmie” Nelson, Jr.

“Winter school work done in dining room next to coal burning pot belly stove. Heavy drapes to close living room off. House heated by registers, water circulated by furnace in basement. Coal storage room in basement to be hand fed to furnace. Sometime during W.W. II Grandpa had the furnace converted to oil fed. In the basement there was a vegetable room for canned foods, sacks of potatoes, and bags of sugar, etc…

There was a double sink to wash clothes, and one sink had a wringer. There was a four burner stove to heat copper boiler for washing clothes (hot water). Basement foundation large stones. They were white washed every summer.

Three bedrooms upstairs. Me & Grandpa across from each other, bathroom head of the stairs. Mom & Shirley & Dickie on cot in front bedroom and stairs to divided attic, basement, main floor, and upstairs attic.

Backyard, wall with 2 car garage one for storage & one for Grandpa’s 1937 Buick, 2 door. In the winter grandpa would take battery to basement to charge. He would open the door while he charged battery & run motor for a while to circulate motor.

During W.W. II Grandpa had the s/w radio on all day long so we knew what part of the world the fighting was going on. He got the Chicago Tribune with all of the war locations, etc.

When Grandpa was listening to the radio, reading, he used to roll Prince Albert out of the can. He smoked for years, he just up and quit.

3rd. Street was one of the steepest streets in Dubuque & Grandpa walked it after going downtown to the Stock Market. One day it got his wind, so doctor told him to stop smoking & he did.

Grandpa was a Jehovah’s Witness, a real bible study man. He knew a little about everything, a very smart man.

He did not like kids for years. Grandpa was a very frugal man because money was very tight when he grew up.

His lifetime employment was with the government out of Rock Island, Illinois. He used to cut down trees to use as wing dams to help control the Mississippi Spring floods. Later government dams to help control the floods from Minnesota to New Orleans, Louisiana.

Grandpa worked his way up to barge inventory from Rock Island, the main office still there today. Rock Island, Illinois Munitions Factory, is the only one on the river that still makes our machine gun bullets and bombs.

He got Uncle Arturo “Art” Ayala a job with the Rhode Island office. “Ari” started out sweeping floors & after many years worked his way up to Lock Master – Lock & Dam III- Dubuque, Iowa. That was neat because we could walk the dam to Wisconsin side. Pretty neat to see all of that water rushing through the locks.

When we were young, family and friends would catch a bus up to Eagle Point Park. It was beautiful place with lots of room for kids to play. Beautiful rock gardens, tennis courts, etc. There are several lookout places so you can see this Mississippi, Wisconsin & Illinois & Eppie & Art Ayala’s government house at the Lock & Dam. Good old days. That was quite a treat!

Grandpa turned out to be a very interesting person with contact with a variety of people. Before us kids came along, Grandpa had done a lot of traveling thru the Midwest, and Hot Springs, Arkansas. Surprise for me.

After I got out of the service (Korea period), 1950-1953, grandpa had changed & became the kind of person you’d want to visit with. Lucky me.”

Our European Travel


March 1980, my mother, Jean Marie (Linderman) Frederick Mancill, my step dad, Louis Clifford Mancill, myself Sally (Frederick) Fallin, and Richard Wayne Fallin traveled to England, FranceBelgium, Holland, and Luxembourg together to visit Richard’s brother Jerry Glen Fallin.

He was in the U.S. Navy stationed in Newquay, Cornwall, England. I met my sister-in-law Frances Katherine Aherne-Conroy there.

I thank God that we traveled when we did, because I got a chance to spend a lot of time with my parents before they left me.

My Dad passed away in 2002, and Mother passed away just this past March 9, 2012 in Rosharon, Brazoria County, Texas. They are dearly missed.

You never really get over it, you just learn to accept death as a part of life, and enjoy the time that you have with each other. My only solace is that we are Christians, and I believe that we will meet again one day in heaven where there is no more sorrow, no more pain.

Sol Ross “Conrad” Tudor~~English And Scottish Ancestors


Sol Ross and Leonard Ross Tudor, 1956, Stephenville, TexasStephenville, TX

(from left to right) Ann & Wayne Tudor, (middle row) Anita, Gladys, Len, Steve, Don, Ross, and Wayne Tudor, 1961, Stephenville, Erath County, Texas, Don, Wayne, and Ross Tudor, 1961 (last row) Sol Ross Tudor, and Donald Raymond Tudor, 1961, Stephenville, Erath County, Texas.
Wayne Tudor with children: Len, Don, Anita, and Steve, Texas, 1961

courtesy of Annie Mae (McCann)Tudor, June 2014

ComancheTexasBankBuilding702

Sol Ross “Conrad” Tudor
 
Birth: Jul. 5, 1890
Stephenville
Erath County
Texas, USA
Death: Dec. 31, 1968
Stephenville
Erath County
Texas, USA

On double marker with Bergie M. Tudor (1899-1941)
Married Bergie Mae (Mobley) on 6 March 1918 in Erath County, Texas.Resided in Stephenville, Erath County, Texas from 1890-1968.

He was the son of Thomas Benton “T.B.” Tudor and Sallie Hampton (Keith) Tudor of Tippah County, Mississippi.Sol and Bergie had 4 children together: Leonard Doyle, Raymond Horton, Mae Corrine (Williams), and Donald Wayne Tudor.
Sol was a farmer and Bergie was a homemaker.My husband, Leonard Ross Tudor, was named after his Paternal Grandfather, Sol Ross Tudor, also known as Conrad, and his uncle Leonard.

name: Ross Sol Tudor
event: Draft Registration
event date: 1942
event place: Stephenville, Erath, Texas
gender: Male
birth date: 05 Jul 1890
nara publication title: World War II Draft Cards (4th Registration) for the State of Texas
nara publication number:  
arc identifier: 576252
film number: 4161310
digital folder number: 004161310
image number: 02842
Citing this Record
“United States, World War II Draft Registration Cards, 1942,” index and images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.1.1/XP51-G6B : accessed 10 Feb 2013), Ross Sol Tudor, 1942; citing NARA microfilm publications M1939, M1936, and M1937; FHL microfilm 4161310.

1920 Census for Stephenville, Erath County, Texas records: SOL ROSS TUDOR, M, W, AGE 29, MARRIED, TEXAS, FARMER, FATHER BORN IN MISSISSIPPI, MOTHER BORN IN TENNESSEE.

S. ROSS TUDOR, DISTRICT 1, STEPHENVILLE, ERATH COUNTY, TEXAS, AGE 39, BORN IN TEXAS, MARRIED AT 27, WHITE, MALE, PARENTS BOTH BORN IN MISSISSIPPI, CLERK IN HOTEL, OWNED HOME WORTH $1500.

name:S Ross Tudor
event:Census
event date:1930
event place:Stephenville, Erath, Texas
gender:Male
age:39
marital status:Married
race:White
birthplace:Texas
estimated birth year:1891
immigration year:
relationship to head of household:Head
father’s birthplace:Mississippi
mother’s birthplace:Mississippi
enumeration district number:0001
family number:124
sheet number and letter:5A
line number:50
nara publication:T626, roll 2326
film number:2342060
digital folder number:4547949
image number:00080
HouseholdGenderAgeBirthplace
headS Ross TudorM39Texas
wifeBergie M TudorF30Texas
sonLenord D TudorM11Texas
sonRaymond H TudorM7Texas
daughterMarge C TudorF3Texas
sonDonald W TudorM2Texas

Family links:
Parents:
Thomas Benton Tudor (1842 – 1917)
Sallie Hampton Keith Tudor (1845 – 1924)

Spouse:
Bergie Mae Mobley Tudor (1899 – 1941)*

Children:
Raymond Horton Tudor (1922 – 2001)*
Corinne Mae Tudor Williams (1926 – 1992)*
Donald Wayne Tudor (1927 – 2012)*

Burial:
West End Cemetery
Stephenville
Erath County
Texas, USA
 
Maintained by: TEXAS TUDORS
Originally Created by: Ken Jones
Record added: Jul 29, 2006
Find A Grave Memorial# 15078889

Related articles

Donald Wayne Tudor~~Stephenville, Erath County, Texas (texastudorsmemorials.wordpress.com)
Thomas Benton “T.B.” Tudor~Southern Heroes (texastudorsmemorials.wordpress.com)

Our Roots In Europe~German, Moravian, Luxembourgish, Norwegian, Scottish, Irish, and English


Europe [1] encompasses an area of 10,180,000 km2 (3,930,000 square miles), stretching from Asia to the Atlantic, and from Africa to the Arctic. European countries welcome more than 480 million international visitors per year, more than half of the global market, and 7 of the 10 most visited countries are European nations. It’s easy to see why – a well preserved cultural heritage, open borders and efficient infrastructure makes visiting Europe a breeze, and rarely will you have to travel more than a few hours before you can immerse yourself in a new culture, and dive into a different phrasebook. Although it is the world’s second smallest continent in land surface area, there are profound differences between the cultures and ways of life in its countries.

Europe consists of a diverse set of countries that each have their own identity, language and culture. Below is a rough grouping of these countries into regions:

Map of Europe’s regions

  Balkans (Albania, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Bulgaria, Croatia, Kosovo, Republic of Macedonia, Moldova, Montenegro, Romania, Serbia, Transnistria)
The Balkans have a rich, though often turbulent, history with wonderful nature, charming multicultural towns, impressive monasteries and citadels dotting the hillsides, mighty mountains sprinkled with a liberal dose of beautiful forests and pleasant lakes.

Baltic states (Estonia, Latvia, Lithuania)
Three fascinating states that have glorious beaches along an extensive coastline, medieval old towns, and beautiful natural scenery. Estonia has linguistic and cultural ties with Finland.
Benelux (Belgium, Luxembourg, Netherlands)
These supposedly flat states have a lot to offer the traveller. The Netherlands is known for its clogs, cheese, tulips and windmills, and for its liberal attitudes and painters. Belgium is a multilingual country with beautiful historic cities, bordering Luxembourg at the rolling hills of the Ardennes.

Britain and Ireland (Guernsey, Ireland, Isle of Man, Jersey, United Kingdom)
Britain is a diverse patchwork of native and immigrant cultures, possessing a fascinating history and dynamic modern culture, both of which remain hugely influential in the wider world. Ireland has rolling landscapes and characteristic customs, traditions and folklore.
Caucasus (Armenia, Azerbaijan, Georgia)
The Caucasus is a mountain range lying between the Black Sea and the Caspian Sea, considered part of the natural boundary between Europe and Asia. The Caucasus is a dense, warm, friendly and generally safe travel region. There are some incredibly diverse landscapes and an exceptional wealth of ancient churches, cathedrals and monasteries.
Central Europe (Austria, Czech Republic, Germany, Hungary, Liechtenstein, Poland, Slovakia, Slovenia, Switzerland)
Straddling east and west, Central Europe is the region where Germanic culture meets Slavic culture. It is home to innumerable historic towns, fairy-tale castles, beer, forests, unspoiled farmland, and plenty of mountain ranges, including the mighty Alps.
France and Monaco
The world’s most popular tourist destination and geographically one of the most diverse countries of Europe. Some of its tourist attractions include Paris, the French Riviera, the Atlantic beaches, the winter sports resorts of the Alps, the castles of the Loire Valley, Brittany and Normandy, and the rural landscape of the Provence. The country is also known for its gastronomy (particularly wines and cheeses), history, culture and fashion.
Greece, Turkey, and Cyprus
Counting the most amount of sun-hours in Europe, the Eastern Mediterranean is a haven for beach-goers, party-people and cultural enthusiasts alike.
Iberia (Andorra, Gibraltar, Portugal, SpainThe Iberian countries are great destinations for their rich and unique cultures, lively cities, beautiful countryside and friendly inhabitants.

Italian Peninsula (Italy, Malta, San Marino, Vatican City)
Rome, Florence, Venice and Pisa are on many travellers’ itineraries, but these are just a few of Italy’s destinations. Italy has more history and culture packed into it than many other countries combined.
Russia, Ukraine, and Belarus
Russia is a country of vast, empty expanses that spans all the way east to the Pacific Ocean. Ukraine is a diverse country that has a lot to offer, from the beach resorts of the Black Sea to the beautiful cities Odessa, Lviv and Kiev. North of Ukraine lies Belarus, a country unlike anywhere else, commonly referred to as the last dictatorship of Europe.
Scandinavia and the Nordics (Denmark, Faroe Islands, Finland, Iceland, Norway, Sweden)
Spectacular scenery of mountains, lakes, glaciers, geysers, waterfalls and volcanoes. Finland is culturally distinct as it has a language unlike the Scandinavian languages.
See also: European microstates

Politically, some countries are a member of the European Union, a supranational and intergovernmental union that aims to integrate the states of Europe in a common political framework. However, Europe is a diverse region and countries have varying ideas of potential membership — some with no intention of joining at all. The eastern border of Europe is ill-defined. Parts of Russia, Turkey and the Caucasus are sometimes considered to be a part of Asia due to culture, history and geography.

Central Europe~~Land of My German and Moravian-Czech Ancestors


Central Europe

Central Europe is a region forming the heart of Europe. It includes the German-speaking countries, four former Warsaw Pact member states that have successfully joined the European Union, and Slovenia, a former Yugoslav republic, now also a member of the EU. Only Switzerland and tiny Liechtenstein are not EU member states but share close economic and cultural ties with the region but also have stayed away largely for economic and historical reasons. It is a large and important region stretching from the Baltic and North Sea in the north to the Adriatic in the south. It is also home to some of Europe’s and the world’s most prosperous economies and cities. Lastly, it includes the fabled mountain range of the Alps which acts a transition zone between the latin, germanic and slavic cultures which all call the region home.

Countries

Austria
The Alps, historic cities and villages, and a wealth of cultural attractions
Czech Republic
Beautiful forests and mountains, and some of the most notable architectural attractions in Europe
Germany

Hungary

 

Liechtenstein
Tiny state which is a financial centre as well as having some picture-postcard scenery

 

Poland
Formerly the sleeping giant of Europe, modern-day Poland is a thriving nation with important national parks and countless historical attractions

 

Slovakia
Slavic region formerly best known as High Hungary, after WW I part of Czechoslovakia, sovereign since 1993. Interesting for its countryside, especially the Tatra Mountains.

 

Slovenia
Often called the miniature Europe, it is on the crossroads of the Slavic, Germanic and the Romanic world.

 

Switzerland

 

Cities

Central Europe has some of the oldest and best preserved cities on the continent. Below is a list of nine of the most notable:

 

  • Berlin — the capital of reunited Germany since 1990, it was divided by force for 45 years during the Cold War; it has emerged as a international cultural centre and an area of rapid development since the fall of the Berlin Wall.
  • Bratislava – the political, cultural, and economic centre of Slovakia with beautiful historical buildings in the old town.
  • Budapest — a wealth of grand architecture, culture and its famous thermal baths, as well as one of the oldest metro systems in the world.
  • Geneva — a wealthy urban banking centre that is home to many international agencies like the Red Cross and the United Nations.
  • Ljubljana — picturesque alpine capital of Slovenia, a charming baroque city with stunning architecture and dynamic nightlife.
  • Munich — the well to do capital of the southern German federal-state of Bavaria, this gateway to the Alps is famous for Oktoberfest, the world’s largest beer festival.
  • Prague — one of Europe’s most attractive and well preserved large cities and has emerged as an expatriate melting pot since the opening of the Iron Curtain.

The economic powerhouse of Europe with major metropolitan cities and some lovely countryside.

Other destinations

  • Alps — probably one of the most important winter destinations in the world, that is home to summer resorts too
  • Baltic Sea Coast — Germany and Poland share the Baltic Sea coast of Central Europe with hundreds of miles of sandy beaches and resorts
  • Białowieża National Park — a huge area of ancient woodland in Poland designated as a UNESCO World Heritage Site
  • Black Forest — smaller mountain range in southwest Germany famous for its scenery and history
  • East Frisian Islands — Germany has many tourist islands in the North Sea
  • Lake Balaton — this scenic Hungarian lake is the largest lake in Central Europe and a year-round tourist hub
  • Neuschwanstein Castle — the well-known fairy-tale castle in the Bavarian Alps in Germany
  • Romantic Road — a popular tourist route through historical towns and romantic castles in Southern Germany
  • Vysoké Tatry — beautiful and unspoiled mountain range peaking at 2600 meters above sea level

Castles appearing straight out of fairy tales dot the entire landscape of Central Europe. Pictured here is Schloss Neuschwanstein near Füssen, Germany.

While ethnically different, the countries of Central Europe share a similar culture and history throughout the ages. Two of the most important political units in the region were the German and Austro-Hungarian empires. They were preceded in the Middle Ages by the Holy Roman Empire, a patchwork of states and statelets whose extent varied over time. Ethnic conflict was a major problem for hundreds of years in Central Europe and culminated in the horrors of the Second World War. With the peaceful reunification of Germany and the recent expansion of the EU to encompass the former Warsaw Pact states in the region, this problem finally seems to have been solved.

It is a common mistake by outsiders to label all the former Warsaw Pact states in the region as being in Eastern Europe. Almost uniformly, inhabitants of Central Europe will be flattered and pleased if you correctly describe their countries as “central European” both geographically and culturally. Conversely, they may be upset if you lapse into Cold War stereotypes. East and West Germany were countries, so better to call it eastern and western Germany. Reunification is all but a thing of the past and seen in a more or less positive light by most there and in all of Central Europe so try to avoid labeling Germans by their recent past. Remember Germans are Germans but Austrians, Liechtensteiners and most Swiss and Luxembourgers all speak German, but are not German! Czech, Polish or Slovakian may sound similar to Russian, but inhabitants of these countries will not take kindly to assumptions of cultural overlap. Lastly, keep in mind that the Czech Republic and Slovakia once shared a country as well and Slovaks in general are very proud of their new found independence.

While they are not currently considered part of Central Europe, the regions of western Ukraine, Kaliningrad Oblast (Russia), Alsace and parts of Lorraine (France), and South Tyrol/Alto-Adige province (Italy), are sometimes also considered Central European. This is due either to their current and or past ethnic makeup and/or previous political histories. The Kaliningrad oblast spent most of its history as a German speaking region and South Tirol remains a largely German-speaking region in northern Italy maintaining strong cultural ties to Austria. Even though Ukraine is predominantly an orthodox country, its westernmost part for the centuries was part of the Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealth and later passed to Austria-Hungary which to some extent influenced it’s unique culture.

Talk

Central Europe, because of its rich heritage of nationalities, likewise is home to many languages. Some languages enjoy national status and thus are taught in schools and used widely in the media. Others however are only regional languages or minority languages and thus are sadly in danger of eventual extinction even though efforts are underway to try to preserve them.

German has the largest number of native speakers in the region and acts as the single “official” language of Austria, Germany and Liechtenstein. In Switzerland, German is the mother tongue of 2/3 of the population and the dominant language of the four official Swiss languages (German, French, Italian & Romansh). There is a small German speaking minority to be found in Poland, Czech Republic and Hungary. It is also spoken outside Central Europe in eastern Belgium and France, and northern Italy (mainly in the region of South Tyrol/Alto Adige). German can be very diverse and appears in many different colorful dialects particular in the Southern German-speaking world (Southern Germany, Austria, Switzerland, Liechtenstein and South Tyrol) were tradition and dialect remains strong.

Czech and Slovak are very closely related and are mutually intelligible. The Sorbian language(s) spoken in eastern Germany near the Polish frontier is also a close relative.

Polish is the dominant language in all regions of Poland. Kashubian, a regional Slavonic language, is spoken in the region around Gdansk in Pomerania in northern Poland. Silesian is a regional language/dialect, (depending on who you ask) found in southwest Poland.

Hungarian is one of the most difficult languages for other Europeans to learn, as it originates from a different language family and is related to Finnish and Estonian. There are 5 million Hungarian speakers living outside Hungary in neighboring countries such as Romania (Transylvania), northern Serbia, eastern Austria and southern Slovakia.

French or Italian are spoken by the majority of the population in the southern and western regions of Switzerland, while Swiss German is commonly taught as a second language. French plays a historic role in alpine northern Italy in the French border regions.

In the Swiss Canton of Graubünden or Grison, Romansh is spoken as a regional language. Almost all Romansh speakers speak either Swiss German and/or Italian as well. It is closely related to Ladin which is spoken in a few mountain valleys of northern Italy and is another endangered regional language. Sadly it is being replaced by German or Italian.

Slovenian is the official language of Slovenia, but it is also spoken by the Slovenian minorities in southern Austria, northeastern Italy and western Hungary. There is also a small Croatian minority in Austria’s Burgenland. Sorbian, Frisian and Low German are Germany’s three native minority languages with exception of Roma. Sorbian is related to Polish and Czech and can be found spoken in both the eastern states of Saxony and Brandenburg. All Sorbs speak German as well and the current Minister President (Governor) of the German federal-state of Saxony is even Sorbian! Frisian is related to English and Dutch and is spoken by tiny minority communities in Schleswig-Holstein and Niedersachsen and neighboring communities in the Netherlands.

Lastly, Low German is spoken by rural communities or as a second language by a few in most federal states of northern Germany and still has a significant role to play in the city states of Bremen, Hamburg and Luebeck and in the states of Niedersachsen, Schleswig-Holstein and particular in the eastern federal-state of Mecklenburg-Western Pomerania. All three German minority languages are endangered languages. Efforts are underway to preserve the languages and their culture but it is seemingly a losing battle.

Finding people who speak and understand English is not a problem in most regions of Central Europe, especially in Switzerland, Austria and Germany. In Poland, Slovenia, Slovakia, Hungary and the Czech Republic, English is widely spoken in the larger cities and by younger people; German and Russian are also spoken and understood by many older people in these countries. Russian, since the end of the Cold War and the unification of Europe is in steady decline. Today German remains important, more for financial and economic reasons instead of cultural or political reasons, as was the case in the past. Slovenians and the Swiss by far lead the region in their ability to speak many different tongues.

Beauty Of Germany~My German Ancestors


Several of my ancestors emigrated from different parts of Germany. My Claussen, Kobel, Rabe, Koch, Linderman, and Frederick? also ( I believe that my paternal grandfather, Karel Fredrich, was born out of wedlock and maybe his father was Bohemian). 
His naturalization papers stated that he was born in Mala Lehota, Moravia. Malá Lehota is a village and municipality in the Žarnovica District, Banská Bystrica Region in Slovakia, in Southern Moravia.
We will never know for sure. He took that secret to his grave. In that day and time the worst thing that you could be is German or illegitimate). (I believe that his mother was single. I have no idea who she was.

My daddy told me that his father, Karel was as dark as you could get, without being black, and that he had told him that he was Bohemian. My paternal grandmother, said that Bohemians were like gypsies and roamed around and the Moravians looked down on Bohemians).

Santa Claus Is Coming To Town~~My Wonderful Memories of Jacinto City, Texas


old-fashioned-santa-claus

I grew up and was raised in the little suburb of Houston, Jacinto City, Harris County, Texas in the sixties. Times were much slower, safer, and more sentimental back then. Families were closer. My Mother and Father, Leroy & Jean (Linderman) Frederick had six children, Joseph, Phyllis, Sally, Karl, Patricia, and Sarah Frederick, in a little frame house with two bedrooms and one bath. Many arguments took place over who was next in the bathroom. Thank God, Daddy knew how to do anything. He added a huge bedroom and bath onto the back of our house for him and mother. We four girls had to share a bedroom. My two brothers had their own room. I can still remember those rooms. Our room had a big picture window, and faced the street. The boys had a smaller room and faced the backyard.

It was a really small house, and we were a very close knit family. We were raised Methodist. We fought but we always forgave each other, because we were family and that is what we were taught that family did.  Thank God, that is what mother taught us, that you only have one family, and love was unconditional. No matter how angry we made  each other.

My mother and daddy always made holidays special. Daddy put up all the lights, and put up the tree, and mother and all of us children decorated the tree. It was always an old fashioned red and green Christmas. We were taught that Jesus was the reason for the season. We always had a nativity scene.

Jean & Lou Mancill, Manger Scene

We had Advent Calendars. We always attended the midnight service on Christmas Eve. We always watched “It’s a Wonderful Life” together. We had fudge, Cherry Wink cookies, food, food, food, and usually ham because we had turkey at Thanksgiving. It was a family affair, and everyone had their jobs, and everything had a place. Mother was an excellent homemaker. She taught all of us girls how to cook, sew, and clean. 

I wish that everyone could have the wonderful, old-fashioned Christmas’ that we had. I know without a doubt, that this world would be a much better if there were more God, Jesus, and Godly families.

Santa Claus on firetruck, Jacinto City, TX

We believed in Santa Claus, and were always so excited when Santa Claus came down our street on the firetruck before Christmas. We knew that he wasn’t the real Santa, mother told us that he was Santa’s helpers, because he was too busy delivering presents to visit everyone. We each got a stocking full of candy. We loved candy! 

Christmas Stockings

We each had our own stocking full of fruit, nuts, and candy, even mother and daddy. We had no fireplace, so we hung them on the wall. Mother had the Sears catalog for us to look at and dream about what all Santa was going to bring us. She had us circle the things that we wanted. Then she had us go back and pick only ten things that we wanted. We always got most of what was on our lists. My favorite smell is of a real tree, and my new baby dolls. I loved books even then. I loved the smell of new books. I always got at least one baby doll, books, and mother and daddy gave us clothes, or things we needed. As I got older, I had to have Barbie, Ken, Allen, Midge dolls, and all their clothes and house. I loved to read and write even as a little girl.

Even at 58, I still have my dolls, books, and teddy bears. 

Christmas Tree, Dec. 8, 2012

Mother nurtured my love for books and reading. She taught us the correct way to spell, by making us read the Dictionary and playing Scrabble. Her work was never done, and daddy worked all the time. If he was not at work, then he was working in our yard. We always had one of the most beautiful yards in our neighborhood. We lived at 1709 Cheston Drive, Jacinto City, Texas. We had loads of neighbors and we were all close with them. We played lots of games together like “kick ball”, football, baseball, and “hide and seek”. Someone was always having a birthday party. We had lots of parties. We celebrated life. Daddy was an excellent cook too, and made the best barbecue chicken ever. He made his own barbecue sauce. He loved Worcestershire sauce

We visited our maternal grandparents on Christmas Eve, Santa came on Christmas morning, and then we still had Christmas night to look forward to at my paternal grandmother‘s house. My paternal grandmother, Elizabeth Annie “Bessie” (Mazac) Frederick, was really poor and had very little materially, but she always had sweets and soda pop for us. She made the best Kolaches because she was Moravian. She always had something small for us to open. We were so excited to bring our Christmas presents to show off to grandma Bessie. She was a Widow and raised five children on her own. My paternal grandfather died before mother and daddy married, so I never got the chance to know him. She was a Custodian for the Crosby ISD for years. She loved her family and lived for them. She was Catholic and attended mass regularly. 

We were richly blessed to be born at that time in Texas and America. The best country in the world to live in, even with all the corruption in our politicians. We need to elect more Godly people to run our country. God bless America. God save America.

Mother And I Loved Old Trees With Character


Me And Mother Loved Old Trees With Character. She told me how her Mother would take all four of her girls for a walk in the woods, and she would point out different colored leaves, and trees with character. She told me that she didn’t want to walk. Her Mother would drop them off and make them walk back to the car. Her Mother pointed out an old dead tree, and how beautiful it was. Mother would whine that she didn’t see nothing beautiful just an old dead tree. My Grandmother was a fan of Ralph Waldo Emerson.  She tried to get her children interested in finding the good in things, and love of nature.

Mother did the same to us, and I was the one whining about I didn’t want to walk, and that I didn’t see anything beautiful about an old dead tree.

Near the end of Mother’s life she told me that story of her Mother, and I told her that I understood because I felt the same way when I was younger. Today, I think all of God’s nature is beautiful, even the dead leaves, plants, and trees. There is a season and time for everything.

When I was in high school English my teacher made us memorize a poem, and then we would have to read it aloud. I chose the one, “There is none so lovely as a Tree…”

Trees

I think that I shall never see
A poem lovely as a tree.
A tree whose hungry mouth is prest
Against the earth’s sweet flowing breast;
A tree that looks at God all day
And lifts her leafy arms to pray;
A tree that may in summer wear
A nest of robins in her hair;
Upon whose bosom snow has lain;
Who intimately lives with rain
Poems are made by fools like me
But only God can make a tree.

— Joyce Kilmer

I always loved trees. I was a tomboy, I climbed up into the tree to escape my little brother and sisters, and to keep them from bugging me. I dreamed of my Daddy building me a Tree house to play in.

RAYMOND JOSEPH CHRIST


 Raymond Joseph Christ
 
Birth: May 19, 1934
Sheldon
Harris County
Texas, USA
Death: Sep. 11, 2012
Houston
Harris County
Texas, USA 

Grandparents: Emil Christ and Antonia “Tony” (Janisch) Christ.
Parents: Edward “Eddie” John Christ and Agnes Rainie (Frederick) Christ.
They were the parents of one daughter, Peggy Gene Christ, who died in infancy, in 1945, and one son, Raymond Joseph Christ.
First wife: Jo Ann (Jones) Bennett, married on 24 December 1958, in Houston, Harris County, Texas.
Raymond adopted her 3 yr. old daughter, Teri Nell Bennett. Raymond and Jo Ann had two girls together, Brenda Lee (Sternthal)and Jessica Renee Sanders).
They resided in Royalwood subdivision off Hwy. 90A, Houston, Texas 77049.
Raymond was a veteran of the U.S. Army.
Raymond and Jo Ann divorced in 1976.
Second wife: Barbara Lynn Martin, on 23 September 1983, in Harris County, Texas.
No children from that marriage.
Raymond is survived by his second wife, Barbara Lynn.
His three daughters, Teri Nell (Nelson), Brenda Lee (Sternthal), and Jessica Renee (Sanders).CLAYTON FUNERAL HOME OBIT:Raymond Joseph Christ, 78, passed away on September 11, 2012. He is preceded in death by his parents, Edward and Agnes Christ; and sister, Peggy Gene Christ. Ray is survived by his loving wife of 29 years, Barbara Christ; step sons, Robert Rowlett, Andy Rowlett and his wife, Becky; daughters, Teri Nell Christ (Nelson), Brenda Christ (Sternthal) and her husband, Rich, Renee Christ (Sanders), and her husband, Gene; grandchildren, Kenneth, Craig, Amy, Cortni, Britney, Jill, Dana, Baylor, and Nicole; great grandchildren, Gabby, Gavin, Garrett, Grace, Victoria, Hunter, Landon, and Carson; and a host of other family and friends.A visitation for Ray will be held on Thursday, September 13, 2012 from 6:00 until 8:00 pm at Clayton Funeral Home, 5530 W. Broadway, Pearland, Texas 77581. The funeral service will be held on Friday, September 14, 2012 at 11:00 am at Clayton Funeral Home with Pastor Keith Anderson officiating. Interment with military honors will be on Monday, September, 17, 2012 at 2:00 pm at Houston National Cemetery, 10410 Veterans Memorial Drive – Houston, TX77038.http://www.claytonfuneralhomes.com/obits/More pics and info will be added as time allows.Parents:
Edward John Christ (1909 – 1982)
Agnes Rainie Frederick Christ (1914 – 2009)
Burial:
Houston National Cemetery
Houston
Harris County
Texas, USA
Created by: TEXAS TUDORS
Record added: Sep 11, 2012
Find A Grave Memorial# 96894803

Top Ten Free Genealogy Websites To Find Ancestors


  • The Top 10 Free Genealogy Websites to Find Your Ancestors

  • June 15, 2009
  • By Ryan Dube
  • A few years ago, during a family reunion, I learned for the first time that my granduncle on my father’s side had fought and died in World War II. The story of his demise sparked a personal interest toward my own family history.So, I did what I always do when I have something to research – I turned to the Internet. I quickly discovered that while there are certainly free genealogy websites out there, the truly valuable or unique ones are few and far between.

    During this research, I learned two things about people interested in genealogy. First, many of them are clearly not web page designers. Second, they really, really love links.

Without exaggerating, there are thousands of genealogy websites out there. MakeUseOf has touched on genealogy resources before – such as Mackenzie’s review of the GRAMPS software that lets you track your research, or Kinshuk’s review of the Kindo family tree building tool. When it comes to genealogy websites, they mostly all seem to be nothing more than lists of links to other resources.

Occasionally you’ll find a truly useful website with a search feature that accesses real data. For the purpose of this article, I will provide a list of the top 10 free genealogy websites that would be most valuable to anyone first entering into the hobby. These sites provide valuable tools, guides and access to databases that are overflowing with historic data.

During this research, I learned two things about people interested in genealogy. First, many of them are clearly not web page designers. Second, they really, really love links.

10. KindredTrails.com – Lots of Links to Valuable Resources

genealogy

There are two things that mark KindredTrails as a “typical” genealogy website. The first is that there are links to Ancestry.com on almost every page. This seems like a sort of pandemic with genealogy sites.

Secondly, like most other ancestry sites, KindredTrails is very much a link-oriented site. However, it does make it onto the top ten list because the site is well designed, the links are well organized. Additionally, the links provided on this site are very useful and valuable.

9. Access Genealogy.com – A Great Mix of Research Resources

genealogy2Access Genealogy is up a notch from the typical ancestry website. Its main page is pleasantly clean and well organized. Along the left side you’ll find links to some of the most unique research sources including charts, links to old letters, military records, native american records and much more.

One of the more fascinating resources here are the transcribed cemetary records. There are researchers in every State around the U.S. that walk through the oldest cemetaries and actually transcribe names along with birthdates, date of death and family members. This resource alone will hold your interest for hours.

8. The Olive Tree – The Starting Point for Any Amateur Researcher

genealogy3

Olive Tree Genealogy is another private researcher’s website holding a collection of links and resources for historical data. One thing that sets this site apart from others is that it’s apparent a great deal of research went into the provided links. The website creator, Lorine McGinnis Schulze, writes that she started the site in 1996 in order to provide free resources to other researchers.

The truth is, she delivers well on that promise. One of the more impressive links on the site are the ship passenger lists where you can search through the names of your ancestors who immigrated to the U.S. decades ago. Another very useful resource for anyone first starting out in genealogy is the “guide for beginners” that walks you through each step of finding your ancestors, and gives you the specific resources you should check out first in order to conduct that research.

7. GeneaBios – Reading about Life Stories

genealogy4

Ancestry research aside, if you’ve ever found yourself fascinated by the life story of someone who lived a hundred or more years before you were born – then this biography database should be your first stop. You can search through the database alphabetically or just search by specific name.

This database turns up a very long list of biographies written up by genealogy researchers who’ve conducted a thorough investigation and provide their results. Read about the person who built the old stone tavern in the middle of town, or the lives of the people who founded the community where you live.

The Top 10 Free Genealogy Websites to Find Your Ancestors

Without exaggerating, there are thousands of genealogy websites out there. MakeUseOf has touched on genealogy resources before – such as Mackenzie’s review of the GRAMPS software that lets you track your research, or Kinshuk’s review of the Kindo family tree building tool. When it comes to genealogy websites, they mostly all seem to be nothing more than lists of links to other resources.

Occasionally you’ll find a truly useful website with a search feature that accesses real data. For the purpose of this article, I will provide a list of the top 10 free genealogy websites that would be most valuable to anyone first entering into the hobby. These sites provide valuable tools, guides and access to databases that are overflowing with historic data.

genealogyThere are two things that mark KindredTrails as a “typical” genealogy website. The first is that there are links to Ancestry.com on almost every page. This seems like a sort of pandemic with genealogy sites.

Secondly, like most other ancestry sites, KindredTrails is very much a link-oriented site. However, it does make it onto the top ten list because the site is well designed, the links are well organized. Additionally, the links provided on this site are very useful and valuable.

9. Access Genealogy.com – A Great Mix of Research Resources

genealogy2Access Genealogy is up a notch from the typical ancestry website. Its main page is pleasantly clean and well organized. Along the left side you’ll find links to some of the most unique research sources including charts, links to old letters, military records, native american records and much more.

One of the more fascinating resources here are the transcribed cemetary records. There are researchers in every State around the U.S. that walk through the oldest cemetaries and actually transcribe names along with birthdates, date of death and family members. This resource alone will hold your interest for hours.

8. The Olive Tree – The Starting Point for Any Amateur Researcher

genealogy3

Olive Tree Genealogy is another private researcher’s website holding a collection of links and resources for historical data. One thing that sets this site apart from others is that it’s apparent a great deal of research went into the provided links. The website creator, Lorine McGinnis Schulze, writes that she started the site in 1996 in order to provide free resources to other researchers.

The truth is, she delivers well on that promise. One of the more impressive links on the site are the ship passenger lists where you can search through the names of your ancestors who immigrated to the U.S. decades ago. Another very useful resource for anyone first starting out in genealogy is the “guide for beginners” that walks you through each step of finding your ancestors, and gives you the specific resources you should check out first in order to conduct that research.

7. GeneaBios – Reading about Life Stories

genealogy4

Ancestry research aside, if you’ve ever found yourself fascinated by the life story of someone who lived a hundred or more years before you were born – then this biography database should be your first stop. You can search through the database alphabetically or just search by specific name.

This database turns up a very long list of biographies written up by genealogy researchers who’ve conducted a thorough investigation and provide their results. Read about the person who built the old stone tavern in the middle of town, or the lives of the people who founded the community where you live.

6. Family Tree Searcher – Online Quizzes to Help Your Research

genealogy5

The family tree searcher is another website created by a private researcher. This site is unique in that some of the resources are actually interactive quizzes that allow you to customize your research method.

One very useful quiz in particular is the “free advice” quiz, which asks you a series of questions about what you’re looking for, and at the end it provides you with a customized “research plan” along with the free resources that are most likely to help.

5. Genealogy Today – The Google of Ancestry

genealogy6

Of all privately created websites, this one is probably one of those that you could bookmark and use for all of your research needs. This site provides links to the usual resources like census data or death records.

What makes this site stand above the rest are the more creative sources offered, such as funeral cards, ration books, criminal records and even business cards. As many researchers know, the most successful results usually come from the more unorthodox methods.

4. U.S. National Archives – The Prime Source for U.S. Ancestry Information

genealogy7If you’re in the U.S. and you’re a historical researcher, the National Archives should be at the very top of your resource list. Eventually, most other websites end up linking to these resources anyway, so why not just start at the source?

This is where you’ll find census information, military records, immigration records, and even bankruptcy records. There are even articles and information on historical researching techniques.

3. U.K. National Archives – A Plethora of U.K. Historical Data

genealogy11The UK also has a valuable resource for history buffs in the form of its own National Archives website.  The main page of this website offers links to data such as births, marriage and deaths, census records, passenger lists and much more. European history is long, and these resources are unbelievably thorough and archived all the way back a thousand years.

On this website, you’ll also find valuable guides and articles on researching family and military history.

2. US GenWeb Project – The Top Source for U.S. Researchers

genealogy9

One of the largest and most valuable resources for historic information available to U.S. genealogy researchers is the USGenWeb project.

This project is made of up historical enthusiasts who actively volunteer their time and energy to provide free informationfor other researchers throughout the country. Just click on the State where you’re looking for information, and you’ll go directly to the State’s GenWeb site where the free resources for your community and local history are provided.

1. WorldGenWeb Project – World History Buffs Unite!

genealogy10

Once you get involved in genealogical research, the fastest thing that becomes apparent is that the hobby knows no borders. You’ll find expert researchers in just about every country from all around the world, and the best research available that brings all of these global enthusiasts together is the WorldGenWeb Project. This resource provides researchers with a safe place where they can focus on valuable and useful resources to conduct their research. Click on the country of your choice and eventually you can drill down to the specific community, and related free genealogy websites where you can hunt for more ancestral information.

Happy Birthday, Aunt Glady Serene Linderman Nelson


The Dubuque County Courthouse. This particular...
The Dubuque County Courthouse. This particular courthouse is an example of Beaux-Arts architecture. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)
Old Cable elevator
Old Cable elevator (Photo credit: Wikipedia)
Seal of the City of Dubuque, Iowa.
Seal of the City of Dubuque, Iowa. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

My Great Aunt Glady Serene Linderman Nelson would have been 106 years of age today. She always remembered our birthdays, even nieces and nephews, that she had never met. She never forgot to send a birthday card with a dime or quarter. She did not have much, but whatever she could send she would. It impressed on my little mind growing up, that someone all the way up in Dubuque, Iowa was thinking about me.

It made me feel special.

Besides the fact that we didn’t get much mail, and when a letter was just for me, it was exciting. Aunt Glady was a Proofreader for the Dubuque Telegraph Herald newspaper for years. She was the strong matriarch in the Nelson clan. She divorced and moved to the Linderman Home place at 705 West Third Street, Dubuque, Iowa with her widowed father. Glady cared for her father up until his death in 1968. Her father, Edward Francis Linderman and mother Gudrun Ivarra Lund Linderman had their home built in the 1900’s, and it still stands today. It is beautifully kept up.

My mother, Jean Marie Linderman Frederick Mancill and step dad, Louis Clifford Mancill took me and my brother Karl Thomas Frederick, and our cousin, Rebecca Sue Cooke Reeder Floyd to visit them in June 1970. We got to sleep in the attic. We rode the cable car, which terrified me to death. I was scared of heights and that car went straight down the mountain. Back then, children could walk to the store to pick up some things.

 

Me, Karl, and Rebecca “Becker” walked to the little store down the alley and bought some licorice and other treats. We were happy. A quarter used to buy a lot back then.

Dear Aunt Glady, you are gone but not forgotten. RIP Below is the memorial that I made for her.

Gladys Serene “Glady Serena” Linderman Nelson
 
Birth: Aug. 17, 1906
Winona
Winona County
Minnesota, USA
Death: Apr. 28, 1996
Houston
Harris County
Texas, USA

Daughter of Edward Francis “Edy” Linderman & Gudrun Ivarra “Gud” Lund Linderman, of Dubuque, Dubuque County, Iowa.
Baptized as Lutheran on November 11, 1906 in Winona, Minnesota. Gladys liked to be called Glady and preferred Serena instead of Serene.
Wife of Roy Leonard Nelson, Sr. They married in 1927 in Dubuque, Iowa.
Mother of Roy Leonard “Jimmy” Nelson Jr, Richard Edward”Dickie”, & Shirley Lorraine Nelson.
Glady & Roy Sr. were divorced.
Glady resided with her Father after her Mother died, and cared for him up until his death in 1968.
Great Aunt “Glady” worked as a Proofreader for the Dubuque newspaper, the Dubuque Telegraph Herald until she retired.
Then she sold the Linderman homestead at 705 W. Third Street, Dubuque, Iowa, and moved to California to be near her sister, Evelyn “Eppie” (Linderman) Ayala, and brother-in-law, Arturo “Art” Ayala.
Glady always remembered the nieces and nephews, and Great nieces and nephews on our birthdays. We could always count on getting a birthday card from her with some money in it. She couldn’t afford much, but we thought that a dime or a quarter was a lot of money, because back then in the 1960’s it was. It made me feel special–knowing that someone that I hardly knew–way off in Iowa, was thinking of me.
Great Aunt Glady resided with her son Roy “Jimmy” Leonard Nelson Jr., at 4045 Linkwood Drive, Houston, Harris County, Texas for the last few years of her life.
Cremated in Texas and ashes were brought back to Iowa and spread around Mother, Gudrun (Lund) Linderman’s gravesite, in Linwood Cemetery, Dubuque, Iowa, because that is how she wanted it. Her Father’s ashes were also spread around Gudrun’s gravesite.Family links:
Parents:
Edward Francis Linderman (1875 – 1968)
Gudrun Ivarra Lund Linderman (1881 – 1924)Spouse:
Roy Nelson (1899 – 1958)Children:
Shirley Loraine Nelson Ogle (1928 – 1982)*
Richard Edward Nelson (1933 – 2006)*
Burial:
Linwood Cemetery
Dubuque
Dubuque County
Iowa, USA 
 
Created by: TEXAS TUDORS
Record added: Aug 21, 2007
Find A Grave Memorial# 21069469
Gladys Serene Glady Serena <i>Linderman</i> Nelson
Added by: TEXAS TUDORS
Gladys Serene Glady Serena <i>Linderman</i> Nelson
Added by: TEXAS TUDORS
Gladys Serene Glady Serena <i>Linderman</i> Nelson
Added by: TEXAS TUDORS

Donald Wayne Tudor


Birth: Dec. 9, 1927 Stephenville Erath County Texas, USA Death: Apr. 16, 2012 Uvalde Uvalde County Texas, USA [Edit Dates]

Parents: Sol Ross “Conrad” Tudor & Bergie Mae (Mobley) Tudor of Stephenville, Texas. His brothers, Leonard Doyle, & Raymond Horton Tudor preceded him in death. His sister, Mae Corrine Tudor (Williams) also preceded him in death. Grandparents: Thomas Benton “T.B.” Tudor & Sallie Hampton (Keith) Tudor of Tippah County, Mississippi.

Great Grandparents: Jesse Gee Tudor & Eliza Jane Boone Cutbirth Tudor of Tennessee. Married: Annie Mae (McCann) 11 May 1955 in Stephenville, TX. Wayne was a proud World War II veteran of Air Force. Children: Leonard “Len” Ross, Anita Corrine “Nita”, and Donald “Don” Raymond Tudor. Step son, Steve Morgan. Beloved father, honorable husband, and proud Air Force Veteran of World War II. Served his community all his life. He was a unselfish person, who helped when he could.

Resided: Uvalde, Texas. His wife, Annie Mae, and step son, Steve Morgan, cared for him at home until just before his passing. Died in the Uvalde Hospital, Uvalde, Texas on 16 April 2012 Visitation held in Uvalde and Stephenville, Texas. Funeral services at the Stephenville Funeral Home, Stephenville, Texas. Burial on 22 April 2012 in the West End Cemetery, Stephenville, Texas.

Parents: Sol Ross Tudor (1890 – 1968) Bergie Mae Mobley Tudor (1899 – 1941) Burial: West End Cemetery Stephenville Erath County Texas, USA Created by: TEXAS TUDORS Record added: Apr 23, 2012 Find A Grave Memorial# 88992355

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Teutoburg Forest, Germany


The Battle of the Teutoburg Forest (described as clades Variana, the Varian disaster by Roman historians) (German: Schlacht im Teutoburger Wald, Hermannsschlacht or Varusschlacht) took place in 9 CE, when an alliance of Germanic tribes led by Arminius of the Cherusci ambushed and decisively destroyed three Roman legions, along with their auxiliaries, led by Publius Quinctilius Varus. Despite numerous successful campaigns and raids by the Roman army over the Rhine in the years after the battle, the Romans were to make no more concerted attempts to conquer and permanently hold Germania beyond the river.

National Anthem of the Confederate States of America


 

Seal of the Confederate States of America
Seal of the Confederate States of America (Photo credit: Wikipedia)
Confederate National Flag since Mar 4 1865 (Mo...
Confederate National Flag since Mar 4 1865 (Mobile version) (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

HONOR OUR HERITAGE. IT IS ABOUT HERITAGE NOT HATE. RIP ALL OUR SOUTHERN ANCESTORS THAT DIED FIGHTING TO KEEP AMERICA UNITED AND FREE.

CIVIL WAR SOLDIERS
A Virtual Cemetery created by: TEXAS TUDORS

Description: To honor all the soldiers that have died for what they believed in.

Records 1 to 26 (of 26 total matches)

Name etery
Carroll, Sgt Samuel Houston 66063182
b. Nov. 15, 1838 d. May 30, 1863
Oakland Cemetery
Atlanta
Fulton County
Georgia, USA
Davis, I 3185433
b. unknown d. Mar. 8, 1863
Nashville National Cemete…
Nashville
Davidson County
Tennessee, USA
Frederick, A 2980553
b. unknown d. May 14, 1864
Chattanooga National Ceme…
Chattanooga
Hamilton County
Tennessee, USA
Frederick, Corp C.B. 8489694
b. unknown d. Aug. 16, 1863
Vicksburg National Cemete…
Vicksburg
Warren County
Mississippi, USA
Frederick, John 32489541
b. unknown d. Sep. 22, 1905
Chalmette National Cemete…
Chalmette
St. Bernard Parish
Louisiana, USA
Hampton, J. L. 12343586
b. Oct. 20, 1840 d. Dec. 24, 1883
Oak Dale Cemetery
Huckabay
Erath County
Texas, USA
Hancock, Jefferson Blufe 12219891
b. Jun. 8, 1845 d. Feb. 26, 1923
West End Cemetery
Stephenville
Erath County
Texas, USA
Hancock, William M. 40574062
b. Aug. 25, 1836 d. Nov. 5, 1923
Proctor Cemetery
Proctor
Comanche County
Texas, USA
Keith, J. H. 20578911
b. Feb. 21, 1829 d. Nov. 8, 1901
Johnson Cemetery
Erath County
Texas, USA
Linderman, Aaron 3255971
b. unknown d. Dec. 15, 1863
Alexandria National Cemet…
Alexandria
Alexandria city
Virginia, USA
Linderman, Sgt Abraham 21069099
b. 1810 d. Sep. 13, 1891
Woodlawn Cemetery
Winona
Winona County
Minnesota, USA
Linderman, Alexander 33636912
b. unknown d. Oct. 20, 1862
US Soldiers’ and Airmen’s…
Washington
District of Columbia
District Of Columbia, USA
Linderman, Alonzo S 3193962
b. unknown d. Apr. 1, 1865
Nashville National Cemete…
Nashville
Davidson County
Tennessee, USA
Linderman, Lieut Charles 15691007
b. Feb. 4, 1839 d. Apr. 15, 1907
Clarinda Cemetery
Clarinda
Page County
Iowa, USA
Linderman, Sgt Cornelius 10023701
b. 1802 d. Apr. 7, 1864
Vicksburg National Cemete…
Vicksburg
Warren County
Mississippi, USA
Linderman, Pvt Elijah Abraham 24309936
b. 1843 d. Jul., 1861
Oak Hill Cemetery
Boone County
Illinois, USA
Linderman, George 2891281
b. unknown d. Mar. 4, 1864
Rock Island National Ceme…
Rock Island
Rock Island County
Illinois, USA
Linderman, John 2501543
b. unknown d. May 17, 1865
Loudon Park National Ceme…
Baltimore
Baltimore City
Maryland, USA
Linderman, Samuel Lloyd 32107648
b. Mar. 7, 1832 d. Mar. 22, 1920
Saint Michaels Cemetery
Birdsboro
Berks County
Pennsylvania, USA
Linderman, Thomas Gilbert 38879815
b. 1828 d. Jun. 25, 1905
Howard Cemetery
Ipava
Fulton County
Illinois, USA
McAdams, George W 71204084
b. Mar. 25, 1843 d. Feb. 20, 1915
Bristol Cemetery
Bristol
Ellis County
Texas, USA
Palen, Pvt George 58508083
b. unknown d. Nov. 9, 1862
Knoxville National Cemete…
Knoxville
Knox County
Tennessee, USA
Tipton, T. J. 12342418
b. Aug. 20, 1837 d. Jul. 26, 1901
Oak Dale Cemetery
Huckabay
Erath County
Texas, USA
Tudor, Isaiah Davis 37479572
b. Apr. 12, 1836 d. Oct. 12, 1916
Evergreen Cemetery
Paris
Lamar County
Texas, USA
Tudor, Thomas Benton 21076143
b. Jul. 2, 1842 d. May 25, 1917
Corinth Cemetery
Stephenville
Erath County
Texas, USA
Tudor, William Duncan “W. D.” 2537972
b. 1836 d. Jan. 3, 1865
Finns Point National Ceme…
Pennsville
Salem County
New Jersey, USA

 

My Mother~~My Heroine


Birth: Dec. 3, 1927 Dubuque Dubuque County Iowa, USA Death: Mar. 9, 2012 Rosharon Brazoria County Texas, USA

Jean Marie (Linderman)Frederick Mancill, daughter of Phyllis “Phyl” (Palen) Linderman and Harry William Linderman. Granddaughter of Frank Joseph Palen and Emma Elsie (Claussen) Palen, also of Edward Francis Linderman and Gudrun Ivarra (Lund)Linderman of Dubuque, Iowa.

Wife of LeRoy Eugene Frederick. Married 15 November 1947, Liberty, Texas. Divorced 1968. Six children together: Joseph Lee, Phyllis Jean, Sally Ann, Karl Thomas, Patricia Marie, and Sarah Kay Frederick.

Wife of Louis Clifford Mancill. Married 5 December 1968, Houston, Texas. He preceded her in death. No children of this union. One step son, Michieal Wayne Mancill. Mother just passed today, March 9, 2012, in Rosharon, Texas. She left us peacefully to be with Jesus. I am so grateful to have been able to spend the last six years living together with Mother. We got to be even closer than ever. She was blessed with a good life, and a good family.

The services were held Tuesday, March 13, 2012 at Strickland Funeral Homes, in Somerville, TX, and burial followed at the same Oaklawn Cemetery, the same one where Aunt Yvonne, Uncle Kenneth, and Aunt Billie are buried.

Mother left us just like she wanted to. She was at home surrounded with family that loved her. She just drifted off, and the angels came to get her. My consolation was she was not in pain, and not alone, and I was able to be there with her for her last week of her life.

Mother’s viewing was held on Monday, March 12, 2012 from 4-9pm. The funeral services were on Tuesday, March 13, 2012 @11am @ Oaklawn Cemetery Pavilion, on Hwy. 36 in Somerville, TX. location at:, Strickland Funeral Home at 545 8th Street, SOMERVILLE, TEXAS 77879, (979)596-2133.

Family links: Parents: Harry William Linderman (1903 – 1995) Phyllis Eugenia Palen Linderman (1904 – 1963) Spouses: LeRoy Eugene Frederick (1926 – 2006) Louis Clifford Mancill (1924 – 2002) Burial: Oaklawn Cemetery Somerville Burleson County Texas, USA Created by: TEXAS TUDORS Record added: Mar 10, 2012 Find A Grave Memorial# 86532980

Our Last Thanksgiving Together


Sally Tudor and Jean Mancill on November 2011, our last Thanksgiving together at Phyllis and Danny Hyden’s house in Rosharon, TX.  We wore our traditional holiday dresses that we had made for us. I have many years of good memories of her and my Dad, and all our holidays together.
She turned 84 on December 3. Mother left us to be with Jesus and all her loved ones who had already left this earth for heaven, on March 9, 2012.
I am so grateful to have had the last six years to spend lots of quality time with Mother before she left us to go to heaven to be with Jesus. She didn’t like the fact that all of her family and friends had left her. She was the strong, matriarch of our family. She was the last living Linderman descendant. Mother was dearly loved, and was a blessing in everyone’s life, that she met. 

My Two Biggest Heroes!


My Two Biggest Heroes!

Me-Sally Tudor, my husband-Leonard Tudor, and Jean Mancill- my Mother. She passed away today in Rosharon, Texas. She is no longer suffering. She passed peacefully into Jesus’ arms. She was 84 and she had a long and blessed life. She had six children and one step son. She was the Matriarch of the Linderman line. This was my graduation dinner in March 2009, in League City, Texas at Cheddar’s Restaurant. She has always been there for her children, and we were able to be there for her when she needed us most.

My Maternal 3rd. Great Grandmother, Mary Holman Linderman, English Ancestor


 

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                       Mary Holman Linderman 

Birth: 1815
Montgomery
Orange County
New York, USA
Death: 1884
Winona
Winona County
Minnesota, USA

Mary Holman, was the daughter of John Holman of New York.
She married Abraham Linderman in 1833 in Crawford, Orange County, New York.
In 1856, they moved to Winona, Winona County, Minnesota. The old Linderman Home place was at: 231 E. Mark St., Winona, Winona County, Minnesota.
Mary & Abraham only had two children: Eliza Abraim & Mary Linderman.
The Linderman’s were Lutheran.
DEATH OF OLD SETTLERS
LINDERMAN
“Mary Linderman, wife of A. Linderman, died on the 7th. inst., at her home in this city in her 69th. year. As Mr. and Mrs. Linderman came to reside in Winona in April, 1856, her death takes another from the already diminshed list of old settlers. For the past year Mrs. Linderman has been a sufferer from the disease which finally terminated in dropsy and death, but had the unremitting attention of the members of her family and other kind friends. Mrs. Linderman was a woman of marked industry and force of character, and many can testify to her great kindness of heart. A large company of friends were present at the funeral and followed the remains to their resting place in Woodlawn Cemetery, Winona, Minnesota.”

Family links:
Spouse:
Abraham Linderman (1810 – 1893)*

Children:
Eliza Abraim Linderman (1843 – 1861)*
Mary Linderman (1859 – 1924)*

Burial:
Woodlawn Cemetery
Winona
Winona County
Minnesota, USA
Edit Virtual Cemetery info [?]
Created by: TEXAS TUDORS
Record added: Aug 21, 2007
Find A Grave Memorial# 21069161
Mary <i>Holman</i> Linderman
Added by: TEXAS TUDORS
Mary <i>Holman</i> Linderman
Added by: TEXAS TUDORS
Mary <i>Holman</i> Linderman
Added by: TEXAS TUDORS

My Maternal 3rd. Great Grandfather, Abraham Linderman Resided in Winona, Minnesota


 

 

Sgt Abraham “Abraim” Linderman 
Birth: 
1810
Montgomery
Orange County
New York, USA
Death: 
Sep. 2, 1893
Winona
Winona County
Minnesota, USA
 
Enlisted in Civil War as Pvt. and promoted to Sgt. when he re-enlisted for the Union. A Yankee soldier. [ABRAHAM] A. LINDERMAN WAS A UNION [YANKEE] SOLDIER, ON 14 AUGUST 1862, A SERGEANT IN COMPANY F, OF THE 117th. ILLINOIS INFANTRY , ENLISTED IN CAIRO, ALEXANDER COUNTY, ILLINOIS; DURING THE CIVIL WAR BETWEEN 1862-1865, BOX #000539, EXTRAC. 0053, RECORD #0000169.
He was born in New York. His parents moved from Germantown Twp, Philadelphia County, Pennsylvania to Montgomery, Orange County, New York.
His ancestors settled in Germantown Twp., Pennsylvania in 1697. His ancestors helped found America. Our Linderman ancestors fought in the American Revolutionary War, the War of 1812, American Civil War. We are proud German descendants of the Linderman family, and the Hammell family were from Scotland and England.
Abraham married Mary Hammell 26 November 1835 in Newfield, Orange County, New York.
They moved to Minnesota in 1856. Their homestead was at 231 E. Mark St, Winona, Minnesota.
He and Mary had one daughter Mary Linderman.
God bless my poor ancestors, they lost so much.
Abraham survived the Civil War, and lived until 1893 with his beloved wife Mary, in the Linderman Home place at 231 E. Mark St., Winona, Minnesota.
His wife, Mary (Hammell) Linderman, preceded him in death, in 1884.
They are all buried together in the LINDERMAN Family Plot in Woodlawn Cemetery, Winona, Winona County, Minnesota. 
Family links:
 Spouse:
  Mary Hammell Linderman (1815 – 1884)
 
 Children:
    Mary Linderman (1859 – 1924)
(never married)
Burial:
Woodlawn Cemetery
Winona
Winona County
Minnesota, USA
 
Created by: TEXAS TUDORS
Record added: Aug 21, 2007
Find A Grave Memorial# 21069099

My Minnesota Ancestors, the Linderman, Hammell, and Loftis Families


Abraham and Mary (Hammell) Linderman resided at 231 E. Mark Street, Winona, Minnesota until they passed away. Abraham passed away in 1893, and Mary passed away in 1884. They had one daughter, Mary Linderman. Abraham served with the Union in Illinois during the Civil War. Abraham and Mary, and daughter, Mary Linderman were all buried in the Woodlawn Cemetery, Winona, Minnesota.

THE SURNAME “LINDERMAN” IS A VERY RARE NAME COMPARATIVELY SPEAKING, AND APPEARS TO BE LOCATIONAL IN ORIGIN. IT IS ASSOCIATED WITH THE ENGLISH MEANING,”ONE WHO LIVED AT OR NEAR  A LIME TREE.”   KNOWING THAT DIFFERENT SPELLINGS OF THE SAME ORIGINAL SURNAME ARE A COMMON OCCURRENCE, IT IS NOT SURPRISING THAT DICTIONARIES OF SURNAMES INDICATE PROBABLE SPELLING VARIATIONS OF THE “LINDERMAN” SURNAME TO BE: “LINDERMANN, LIMDERMAN, LIMDERMANN, LINDERMANS, LINDENMANN, LENDERMAN, AND LINDEMAN.”  ALTHOUGH BEARERS OF THE OLD AND DISTINGUISHED “LINDERMAN” NAME COMPRISE A SMALL PERCENTAGE OF INDIVIDUALS LIVING IN THE UNITED STATES, THERE MAY BE A LARGE NUMBER OF YOUR DIRECT RELATIVES WHO ARE USING ONE OF THE “LINDERMAN” NAME VARIATIONS. MOST GERMAN NAMES ARE DERIVED FROM OCCUPATIONS, COLORS, OR LOCATIONS.
THE “LINDERMAN” COAT OF ARMS CONTAINS PURPLE WHICH STANDS FOR LOYALTY AND SPLENDOR, RED WHICH SYMBOLIZES FORTITUDE AND CREATIVE POWER, ALSO GREEN WHICH REPRESENTS HOPE, VITALITY, AND PLENTY.  SILVER REPRESENTS SERENITY AND NOBILITY. GOLD(OR YELLOW) DENOTES GENEROSITY, VALOR, OR PERSEVERANCE.  IT HAS A “LIME TREE” ON THE COAT OF ARMS, AND ALSO ABOVE THE SHIELD AND HELMET IS THE CREST WHICH IS DESCRIBED AS:  “THE LIME TREE”.
IN THE YEAR 1982, THERE WERE “LINDERMANS” LIVING IN 50 OF THE 50 STATES AND THE DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA. THE MOST POPULOUS STATE FOR “LINDERMANS” HAPPENED TO BE CALIFORNIA WITH 127 “LINDERMAN” HOUSEHOLDS. THERE WERE 20 “LINDERMAN” HOUSEHOLDS IN IOWA,  AND 26 IN TEXAS.  INCLUDING “HARRY WILLIAM LINDERMAN” WHO RESIDED IN HOUSTON, HARRIS COUNTY, TEXAS UNTIL 1995 WHEN HE PASSED AWAY.  HARRY WAS MARY LINDERMAN’S ONLY GRANDSON, AND GREAT-GRANDSON OF ABRAHAM LINDERMAN OF WINONA, MINNESOTA. HE IS SURVIVED BY HIS DAUGHTERS:  YVONNE PHYLLIS LINDERMAN BURGESS LEVESQUE,  AND JEAN MARIE LINDERMAN FREDERICK MANCILL OF HOUSTON, HARRIS COUNTY, TEXAS. HARRY WAS PRECEDED IN DEATH BY HIS DAUGHTER, YVARRA “BILLIE” IRENE LINDERMAN JACKSON WHO PASSED AWAY IN 1985 FROM CANCER OF THE ESOPHAGUS. 

 

What I Like About Texas


My Texas ancestors were: Frederick, Mazac, Konecny, Dudika, Volek, Marek, Ryland, Malusek, Cooke, Jackson, Levesque, etc…

My husband’s Texas ancestors were: Tudor, McCann, Mobley, Gillilan, Bishop, Hancock, etc…

English Ancestors of Winona, Minnesota


Mary Holman Linderman
Birth: 1815
Montgomery
Orange County
New York, USA
Death: 1884
Winona
Winona County
Minnesota, USA

Mary Holman, was the daughter of John Holman of New York.
She married Abraham Linderman in 1833 in Crawford, Orange County, New York.
In 1856, they moved to Winona, Winona County, Minnesota. The old Linderman Home place was at: 231 E. Mark St., Winona, Winona County, Minnesota.
Mary & Abraham only had two children: Eliza Abraim & Mary Linderman.
The Linderman’s were Lutheran.
DEATH OF OLD SETTLERS
LINDERMAN
“Mary Linderman, wife of A. Linderman, died on the 7th. inst., at her home in this city in her 69th. year. As Mr. and Mrs. Linderman came to reside in Winona in April, 1856, her death takes another from the already diminshed list of old settlers. For the past year Mrs. Linderman has been a sufferer from the disease which finally terminated in dropsy and death, but had the unremitting attention of the members of her family and other kind friends. Mrs. Linderman was a woman of marked industry and force of character, and many can testify to her great kindness of heart. A large company of friends were present at the funeral and followed the remains to their resting place in Woodlawn Cemetery, Winona, Minnesota.”
Family links:
Spouse:
Abraham Linderman (1810 – 1893)*

Children:
Eliza Abraim Linderman (1843 – 1861)*
Mary Linderman (1859 – 1924)*

Burial:
Woodlawn Cemetery
Winona
Winona County
Minnesota, USA
Created by: TEXAS TUDORS
Record added: Aug 21, 2007
Find A Grave Memorial# 21069161
Mary <i>Holman</i> Linderman
Added by: TEXAS TUDORS
Mary <i>Holman</i> Linderman
Added by: TEXAS TUDORS
Mary <i>Holman</i> Linderman

Germans in Winona, Minnesota


Mary Linderman
Birth: 1859
Bemidji, Clearwater County
Minnesota, USA
Death: May 8, 1924
Dubuque
Dubuque County
Iowa, USA

Only daughter of Abraham & Mary (Hammell) Linderman of Winona, Minnesota.
Linderman homestead was at 231 E. Mark St., Winona, Winona County, Minnesota.
Mother of one child, Edward Francis Linderman, of Dubuque,Dubuque County, Iowa.
Never married (it was a deep, dark secret up until 1995.)
Grandmother of Harry, Gladys, Irene, and Evelyn Linderman.

Her parents, Abraham and Mary (Hammell) Linderman at 231 E. Mark St., Winona, Minnesota up until 1913, when they sold the house and moved in with her son whom had built a new home in Dubuque, Iowa.
Resided with son, Edy, and daughter-in-law, Gud, at 705 W. Third St., Dubuque, Iowa until her death in 1924.
Mary was dedicated to her family, and they had a very close knit family.
Mary was buried at the Woodlawn Cemetery, Winona, Minnesota near her parents, Abraham & Mary (Hammell) Linderman, in the LINDERMAN Family Plot.
The cemetery plot map shows Mary buried next to her parents, Abraham & Mary Linderman, in the Linderman family plot. There is no headstone for her. There was just one big grave marker with an urn on it for flowers, and the name “LINDERMAN” on it.

Cousin, Roy Nelson Jr. photographed it in 1996.
All that exists of it now is a piece of stone with LINDERMAN on it.
Her Mother’s headstone just states “MOTHER” on it.
Their is also a headstone in the “Linderman” family plot for a “BABY”, which in the cemetery records just shows George Bigelow. There was a Bigelow, that worked as a handyman for the E.F. Linderman family at 705 W. Third St, Dubuque, Iowa. My Mother has told me that he helped my Great-Grandfather with his four children, when his Mother, Mary, died in May 1924, and his dear beloved, wife, Gud [Lund] Linderman also died one month later in June 1924.

Family links:
Parents:
Abraham Linderman (1810 – 1893)
Mary Hammell Linderman (1815 – 1884)

Children:
Edward Francis Linderman (1875 – 1968)

 
Burial:
Woodlawn Cemetery
Winona
Winona County
Minnesota, USA
Plot: 35
 
Created by: TEXAS TUDORS
Record added: Aug 21, 2007
Find A Grave Memorial# 21069240
Mary Linderman
Added by: TEXAS TUDORS
Mary Linderman

Germans in Dubuque, Iowa


Edward Francis “Edy” Linderman
Birth: Feb. 9, 1875
Winona
Winona County
Minnesota, USA
Death: Jun. 26, 1968
Dubuque
Dubuque County
Iowa, USA

Only grandson of Abraham & Mary (Holman) Linderman of Winona, Minnesota. Only child of Mary Linderman. Father unknown. E. F. Linderman worked and lived on the Mississippi River all his life. He worked for the U.S.Lock & Dam in LaCrosse, Wisconsin; and Dubuque, Iowa. Married Gudron Ivarra Lund from Norway on 11 September 1902 in Winona, Minnesota. Edward & Gudron had one son, Harry; and three daughters, Gladys Serene, Irene Mary, and Evelyn Frances Linderman. They all resided at 705 W. Third St., Dubuque, Iowa. Great Grandpa was in the I.O.O.F. in Dubuque. He converted to Jehovah’s Witness after the death of his beloved wife, Gud. The children were raised as Lutheran and all baptized as Lutheran in the St. Paul Evangelical Lutheran Church, at 2025 Jackson Street, in Dubuque, Iowa. Edy was cremated and his ashes were scattered around his beloved Gud’s gravesite, because the government told his family, that they couldn’t scatter his ashes in the Mississippi River where he wanted us to.

Family links:
Parents:
Mary Linderman (1859 – 1924)

Spouse:
Gudrun Ivarra Lund Linderman (1881 – 1924)

Children:
Harry William Linderman (1903 – 1995)*
Gladys Serene Linderman Nelson (1906 – 1996)*
Irene Mary Linderman Wiedner (1908 – 1997)*
Evelyn Frances Linderman Ayala (1913 – 1997)*

Burial:
Linwood Cemetery
Dubuque
Dubuque County
Iowa, USA
Created by: TEXAS TUDORS
Record added: Aug 21, 2007
Find A Grave Memorial# 21069314
Edward Francis Edy Linderman
Added by: TEXAS TUDORS
Edward Francis Edy Linderman

Norwegians in Dubuque, Iowa


Gudrun Ivarra “Gud” Lund Linderman
Birth: Aug. 22, 1881
Nord-Trondelag County, Norway
Death: Jun. 9, 1924
Dubuque
Dubuque County
Iowa, USA [Edit Dates]

Emigrated in 1896 from Namsos, Norway as a Governess for the Nabisco Foods family in LaCrosse, Wisconsin.
Married Edward Francis Linderman on September 11, 1902 in Winona, Minnesota. Edy called her Gud.
They had four children together: Harry William, Gladys Serene, Irene Mary, and Evelyn “Eppie” Frances Linderman.
All children were baptized as Lutheran. Harry & Gladys were baptized in Winona, Minnesota. Irene & Evelyn were baptized in the St.Paul Evangelical Lutheran Church, at 2025 Jackson Street, in Dubuque, Iowa.
Edy, Gud, and (mother-in-law) Mary Linderman all resided together at 705 W. Third St, Dubuque, Iowa until her death in 1924. Gudrun had Gall Bladder surgery, and died when a blood clot went to her brain.
My Great Grandfather, Edward Francis Linderman never remarried and continued to grieve her loss until the day he died in 1968. His Mother, Mary Linderman, died one month later in June 1968. What a tragedy!
[Edit Bio]
Family links: [Edit]
Spouse:
Edward Francis Linderman (1875 – 1968)*Children:
Harry William Linderman (1903 – 1995)*
Gladys Serene Linderman Nelson (1906 – 1996)*
Irene Mary Linderman Wiedner (1908 – 1997)*
Evelyn Frances Linderman Ayala (1913 – 1997)*

*Calculated relationship

[Add Marker Transcription]
[Add Note]

Burial: [Edit]
Linwood Cemetery
Dubuque
Dubuque County
Iowa, USA [Add Plot]
Edit Virtual Cemetery info [?]
Created by: TEXAS TUDORS
Record added: Aug 21, 2007
Find A Grave Memorial# 21069285
Gudrun Ivarra Gud <i>Lund</i> Linderman
Added by: TEXAS TUDORS
Gudrun Ivarra Gud <i>Lund</i> Linderman

Our Escape From the City



My Dad bought the land back in 1968, and we worked our butts off building a home there in the woods on the lake. We all worked on it, we built a porch first, then the one room, that became the kitchen. We used an outhouse for years while we worked on it on the weekends and during the summers. Then, we added on the living room, the bath, my Mother & Dad’s bedroom, later we even added the upstairs room, where the rest of us slept.
We have 34 wonderful years of memories up there. My Dad loved to fish, and we ate fried fish and had bonfires and had roasted marshmallows. It has been our home away from home. I love it up there in the woods, and enjoying God’s nature.
The house is older now, and needs repairs, but it is still home and very well built. My Dad could build or fix anything. He was a “jack of all trades”. We lost him in 2006, and I never realized just how much we all depended on him, until he was gone. He was our “rock”, and there will never be anyone who will be able to fill his shoes. I am just grateful to have had him in our lifes for 34 years.

LeRoy & Jean (Linderman) Frederick Children


This is one of my favorite pics of Patricia, Karl, Sarah, & Sally Frederick, @ 11039 Lafferty Oaks St., Houston, TX 77013, 713-674-1600 @ Jean (Linderman) Frederick Mancill & Louis Clifford Mancill’s home, in Wood Shadows. We have had many a happy years here at Lafferty Oaks. We have been through 3-1/2 feet of water in our home during Tropical Storm Allison in July 2001. We worked our butts off gutting out, and remodeling it for a over a year. Karl & I attended Houston ISD school @ Furr High School in Houston, TX. I graduated in May 1972.
Patricia & Sarah lived with Daddy & Barbara Frederick (my step mother) @ 509 Marblehead St., Dayton, TX with Barbara’s children: Jeanna & Joey Faulk. They all attended Dayton ISD schools.
My Mother taught me how to sew at the age of 16, and I made the outfit that I am wearing. Mother made the Raggedy Ann dolls for Sarah & Patricia “Tricia” for Christmas one year.
God blessed us with a Godly Mother and Father, that taught us about God and Jesus. They taught us morals and manners.
All six of Mother’s children all grew up to be fine upstanding American citizens. We took lots of trips to New Braunfels, and Galveston, TX for vacations. Mother and my Step Dad, Louis Clifford Mancill, bought some land up at Sam Houston Lake Estates, near Cleveland, TX in 1969. My Dad built us a two-story house, we call it the “Cabin”. It was our vacation home on the Lake for the weekends. My son, Jason Fallin, learned how to fish on the pier there at the house. We still have that house today. We are richly blessed.

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Karl Thomas Frederick


My baby brother, Karl Thomas Frederick, at the Harry & Phyllis “Phyl” (Palen) Linderman home @ 4102 Arnold Street, Houston, Texas, c. 1958.
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Sarah Harris and Jason McCann


our Texas cousinsGetting Married October 1, 2011!

 

We are so happy for you both. We hope and pray, that you have many happy years together. Hopefully, we will be able to make it to your wedding. Len doesn’t like to travel much, but if he is feeling well enough we will be there.
Love, your Texas cousins, Leonard & Sally Tudor

Our Southern Heritage


The Southern Flag is about Heritage Not Hate!
My Frederick ancestors fought in Louisiana, my husband’s McCann and Mobley ancestors fought in Arkansas, my Dad’s ancestors fought in Alabama, and my husband’s Tudor ancestors fought in Tippah County, Mississippi, and Tennessee, his Craig ancestors fought in Virginia, and his Hancock ancestors fought in Texas.

History of Palatine Immigration and Ship Passenger Lists


History of the Palatine Immigration to Pennsylvania

as written by Daniel Rupp, 1876

At different periods, various causes and diverse motives induced Germans to abandon their Vaterland. Since 1606, millions have left their homes, the dearest spots on earth, whither the heart always turns. Religious persecution, political oppression drove thousands to Pennsylvania – to the asylum from the harrassed and depressed sons and daughters of the relics of the Reformation, whither William Penn himself invited the persecuted of every creed and religious opinion.

From 1682 to 1776, Pennsylvania was the central point of emigration from Germany, France and Switzerland. Penn’s liberal views, and illiberal course of the government of New York toward the Germans, induced many to come to this Province

The period from 1702 – 1727 marks an era in the early German emigration. Between forty and fifty thousand left their native country “their hearths where soft affections dwell.” The unparalleled ravages and desolations by the troops of Louis XIV under Turenne, were the stern prelude to bloody persecutions. To escape the dreadful sufferings awaiting them, German and other Protestants emigrated to the English colonies in America.

In 1705, a number of German Reformed residing between Wolfenbuttel and Halberstadt, fled to Neuwied, a town of Rhenish Prussia, where they remained some time, and then went to Holland – there embarked, in 1707, for New York. Their frail ship was, by reason of adverse winds, carried into the Delaware bay. Determined, however, to reach the place for which they were destined – to have a home among the Dutch, they took the overland route from Philadelphia to New York. On entering the fertile, charming valley in New Jersey, which is drained by the meandering Musconctcong, the Passaic and their tributaries, and having reached a goodly land, they resolve to remain in what is now known as the German Valley of Morrison county. From this point, the Germans have spread into Somerset, Bergan and Essex couties.

At Elizabethtown, where the first English settlement was made in New Jersey, 1664, there were many Germans prior to 1730. There was also a German settlement at a place known as Hall Mill, which is some thiry miles from Philadelphia.

In 1708 and 1709, thirty three thousand, on an invitation of Queen Anne, left their homes in the Rhine country for London, where some twelve or thirteen thousand arrived in the summer of 1708. There were books and papers dispersed in the Palatinate, with the Queen’s picture on the books, and the title page in letters of gold, which, on that account, were called, ‘The Golden Book’, to encourage the Palatines to come to England, in order to be sent to the Carolinas, or to other of Her Majesty’s colonies, to be settle there. These were, for some time, in a destitute condition – wholly depending upon the charity of the inhabitants of the English metropolis.

In the fall of 1709, one hundred and fifty families, consisting of six hundred and fifty Palatines, were transported, under the tutelar auspices of Christian De Grafferied and Ludwig Michell, natives of Switzerland, to North Carolina. As in all new countries, the Palatines were exposed to trials, privations and hardships incident to border life. One hundred of them were massacred by the Tuskarora Indians, Sept 22, 1707. The descendants of these Germans reside in different parts of the State.

At the time these Palatines left England for North Carolina, the Rev. Joshua Kockerhal, with a small band of his persecuted Lutheran brethren, embarked at London 1708, for New York, where they arrived in December, and shortly therafter he, with his little flock, settled on some lands up the Hudson river, which they had received from the crown of England. Two thousand one hundred acres, granted a patent Dec. 18, 1709. The Queen also bestowed upon Kocherthal five hundred acres as a glebe (transcriber’s note: glebe is a plot of land belonging or yielding profit to an English parish church) for the Lutheran church. Newburg is the place of this settlement.

In the meantime, while those were transported to North Carolina, and to New York, three thousand six hundred Germans were transfered to Ireland; seated upon unimproved lands in the county of Limerick, near Arbela and Adair; others, in the town of Rathkeale, where their descendants still reside, and are known to this day, as German Palatines, preserving their true German character for industry, thrift and honorable dealing. Persons who have lately visited them say, “They are the most wealthy and prosperous farmers in the county of Limerick.” They still speak the German language.

Of the large number that came to England, in 1708 and 1709, seven thousand, after having suffered great privations, returned, half naked and in despondency, to their native country. Ten thousand died for want of sustenance, medical attendance, and from other causes. Some perished on ships. The survivors were transported to English colonies in America. Several thousand had embarked for the Silly Islands, a group south-west of England; but never reached their intended destination.

Ten sails of vessels were freighted with upwards of four thousand Germans for New York. They departed the 25th December, 1709 and after a six months’ tedious voyage reached New York in June, 1710. On the inward passage, and immediately on landing, seventeen hundred died. The survivors were encamped in tents, the had brought with them from England, on Nutting, now Governor’s Island. Here they remained til late in autumn, when about fourteen hundred were removed, one hundred miles up the Hudson river, to Livingston Manor. The widowed women, sickly men and orphaned children remained in New York. The orphans were apprenticed by Governor Hunter, to citizens of New York and of New Jersey.

Thee settled on Hudson river were under indenture to serve Queen Anne as grateful subjects, to manufacture tar and raise hemp, in order to repay the expenses of their transport and cost of subsistence, to the amount of ten thousand pounds sterling, which had been advanced by parliamentary grant. A supply of naval stores from this arrangement, had been confidently anticipated. The experiment proved a complete failure. There was mismanagement.

The Germans, being unjustly oppressed, became dissatisfied both with their treatment, and with their situation. Governor Hunter resorted to violent measures to secure obedience to his demands. In this, too, he failed. One hundred and fifty families, to escape the certainty of famishing, left, in the autumn of 1712, for Schoharie Valley, some sixty miles, northwest of Livingston Manor. They had no open road, no horses to carry or haul their luggage – this they loaded on roughly constructed sleds, and did tug those themselves, through a three feet deep snow, which greatly obstructed their progress – their way was through an unbroken forest, where and when the wind was howling its hibernal dirge through leaf-stripped trees, amid falling snow. It took them three full weeks. Having reached Schoharie, they made improvements upon the lands Queen Anne had granted them. Here they remained about ten years, when owing to some defect in their titles, they were deprived of both lands and improvements. In the spring of 1723, thirty-three families removed and settled in Pennsylvania, in Tulpehocken, some fifteen miles west of Reading. A few years afterward, others followed them.

The other dissatisfied Germans at Schoharie, who did to choose to follow their friends to Pennsylvania sought for and found a future home on the frontier in Mohawk Valley.

Queen Anne, who well understood the policy of England, to retain her own subjects at home, encouraged the emigration of Germans, sent some of those whom she had invited in 1708 and 1709, to Virginia; settled them above the falls of the Rappahannock, in Spotsylvania county, where they commenced a town, called Germanna. The locality was unpropitious. They moved some miles further up the river where they soon drove well. From this settlement they spread into several counties in Virginia, and into North Carolina.

Because of the relentless persecution and oppression in Switzerland, a large body of defenseless Mennonites fled from the Cantons of Zurich; of Bern and Schaffhausen, about the year 1672, and took up their abode in Alsace, above Strasbourg, on the Rhine, where they remained till they emigrated, 1708, to London, thence to Pennsylvania. They lived some time at German town, and in the vicinity of Philadelphia. In 1712, they purchases a large tract of land from Penn’s agents in Pequae, then Chester, now Lancaster county. Here this small colony erected some huts or long cabins, to serve temporarily as shelters.

Here the time and again persecuted and oppressed Swiss, separated from friends and much that makes life agreeable, hoped to unmolested begin anew. Here, surrounded on all sides by severed clans of Indians, they located in the gloomy silent shades of a virgin forest, whose undisturbed solitude was yet uncheered by the murmurs of the honey bee, or the twitterings of the swallow, those never-failing attendants upon the woodman’s axe. For the hum and warblings of those, they had not only the shout and song of the tawny sons of the forest, but also the nocturnal howlings of the over watchful dog baying at the sheeny queen of the night, as she moves stately on, reflecting her burrowed light. By way of variety, their ears were nightly greeted by the shrill, startling whoop of the owl, from some stridulous branches overhanging their cabins, and bending to the breeze of evening, or by the sinister croakings of some doleful night songsters in the continuous thickets.

This Swiss settlement formed the nucleus, or centre of a rapidly increasing Swiss, French and German population, in the Eden of Pennsylvania.

Hereafter, the influent accession from the European continent steadily increased, so much so, as to excite attention, and create no small degree of alarm of the “fearful of the day”.

Scarcely had the Mennonites commenced making their lands arable, when they sent a commissioner, Martin Kendig, to Germany and to Switzerland, to induce others to come to Pennsylvania. He was successful. There were large accessions to this new colony in 1711 and 1717 and a few years later. So great was the influx at this time of Swiss and German immigrants, as to call forth, as already stated, public attention, especially of those in office.

Governor Keith, says the record, “observed to the Board – the Governor’s council – that great numbers of foreigners from Germany, strangers to our language and constitution, having lately been imported into this Province, daily dispensed themselves immediatly after landing, without producing certificates from whence they came or what they are, and, as they seemed to have first landed in Britain, and afterwards to have left without any license from government, or as far as they know, so, in the same manner, they behaved here, without making the least application to him or any of the magistrates. That, as this practice might be of very dangerous consequence, since, by the same method, any number of foreigners, from any nation whatever, enemies as well as friends, might throw themselves upon us.” This was in 1717.

In 1719, Jonathan Dickinson remarked; “We are daily expecting ships from London, which bring over Palatines, in number about six or seven thousand. We had a parcel that came over about five years ago, who purchased land about sixty miles west of Philadelphia, and proved quiet and industrious.”

After 1716, Germans, a few French and Dutch, began to penetrate the forest or wilderness – some twenty, thirty, forty, others from sixty to seventy miles, west and north from the metropolis. Large German settlements had sprung up at different points within the present limits of Montgomery and Berks counties. At Goshenhoppen there was a German Reformed church, organized as early as 1717. Some Mennonites coming from the Netherlands, settled along the Pakilmomink (Perkioming) and Schkipeck (Skippack) a few years later.

The Germans were principally farmers. They depended more upon themselves than upon others. They wielded the mattock, the axe and the maul, and by the power of brawny arms rooted up the grubs, removed saplings, felled the majestic oaks, laid low the towering hickory; prostrated, where they grew, the walnut, poplar, chestnut – cleaved such as suited the purpose, into rails for fences – persevered untiringly until the forest was changed into arable field. They were those of whom Governor Thomas said, 1738: ‘This Province has been for some years the asylum of the distressed Protestants of the Palatinate, and other parts of Germany; and I believe, it may truthfully he said, that the present flourishing condition of it is in a great measure owing to the industry of those people; it is not altogether the fertility of the soil, but the number and industry of the people, that makes a country flourish.’

England understood well the true policy to increase the number of the people in her American colonies – she retained at home her own subjects, encourage the emigration of Germans; by this England was the gainer, without an diminution of her inhabitants.

Unreasonable as it may seen, it was this class of Germans, that were so much feared, “whose numbers from Germany at this rate, would soon produce a German colony here, and perhaps such a one as Britain once received from Saxony in the fifth century.”

In 1719, some twenty families of Selwartzenau Taufer arrived at Philadelphia. Some settle in German town, others located on the Skippack, in Oley.

About 1728 and 1729, the Germans crossed the Susquehanna, located within the present limits of York and Adams county, and made improvements under discouraging circumstances.

The tide of emigration from the continent of Europe was strong. Various influences were brought to bear upon the increase of the influx. In Pennsylvania, the Newlander, tools in the hands of shipowners, merchants and importers, contributed much to induce Germans to leave their homes. There were, besides these, another class, who were active in prevailing upon the inhabitants of Germany to abandon their country for the new world. These two classes, Newlander and speculators, resorted to diverse arts in order to effect their purposes. They gave these, whom they desired to abandon their homes, assurances, endorsed by solemn promises, that the Poet’s Arcadia had at last been found in America. To possess this, in Louisiana, on the banks of the Mississippi, several thousands left Germany in 1715 and 1717, under the leadership of the notorious John Law, who instead of bringing them immediately on their arrival in America, to the promised Eden, on the banks of the Father of the Western Water, landed them on the pontines (transcriber’s note: land bridge) of Biloxi near the Mobile. Here they were exposed, without protection against their many foes, for five years. Not one of them entered the promised paradise. Two thousand were consigned to the grave. The pallid survivors – about three hundred, finally seated on the banks of the Mississippi, 1722, some thirty or forty miles above New Orleans. Law had, through his agents, engaged twelve thousand Germans and Swiss. The sad fate of those of Biloxi was spread abroad, which deterred other from coming to participate in the promised blessings of the Elesyan fields, or to possess the Eldorado.

The three hundred on the Mississippi were very poor for some years. They had been reduced to the most extreme poverty. From these poor but honorable Germans, have spring says Gayarre, some of the most respectable citizens of Louisiana, and some of the wealthiest sugar planters in the State. Their descendants forgot the German language, and have adopted the French; but the name of many clearly indicate the blood coursing in their veins; nevertheless more than one name has been so frenchified as to appear of Gallic parentage. The coast, so poor and beggarly at first, and once known as the German coast, has since become the producer and the receptacle of such wealth, so as to be now know by the appropriate name of Coast of Gold.

In the spring of 1734, some Lutherans, known in history as Saltzburgers, from Saltzburg, a city of Upper Austria, arrived in Georgia. In Europe, they too had been the victims of bloody persecution. They had been driven from their country and their homes, on account of their unswerving attachment to the principles of the Gospel.

This devotedly pious band of Christians was accompanied by their attached pastors, the Rev’d John Martin Boltzius and Israel Christian Gronau, and an excellent schoolmaster, Christian Ortman. The Saltzburgers located in Effingham county and styled their first settlement Ebenezer, to express their unfeigned gratitude to the Lord, who had been to them a storing rock, a house of defence, to save them.

This German colony received accessions from time to time until they reached, prior to 1745, several hundred families. There were also many Germans residing in Savannah; besides some forty of fifty Moravians in the same state under the pastoral care for the Rev. David Nitschliman.

The Moravians made no permanent settlement in Georgia. When the Spanish War broke out, they removed, almost to a man, to the State of Pennsylvania, because it was contrary to their religious faith to take up arms in any cause.

In 1738, some arrived in Pennsylvania and located at Bethlehem. In 1740, those who had remained, left Georgia and joined their brethren in Pennsylvania. This, the mission among the Indians in Georgia, after a promising beginning, was at once suspended.

Before the Moravians came to Pennsylvania, a respectable number of Schwenkfelders and arrived, settling in Bucks and Philadelphia county, now Montgomery, Berks and Lehigh. The Schwenkfelders had intended, before leaving their homes in Europe, to embark for Georgia. They however, changed their minds and established themselves in the asylum for the oppressed, Pennsylvania.

In 1732, Monsieur Jean Pierre Pury of Neuchatel, Switzerland visited Carolina. Being encouraged by the government both of England and Carolina, he undertook to settle a colony of Swiss there. In 1732 one hundred and seventy persons were transported. These were soon followed by others. In a short time the colony consisted of three hundred persons. They settled on the north bank of the Savannah, built a town called Purysburgh, about thirty-six miles above the mouth of the river. The colony still continued to increase. In 1734, Pury brought two hundred and seventy persons more from Switzerland. All those were brought from Switzerland at the expense of Pury and several of his friends, who advanced him money for that purpose, he having spent the greatest part of his fortune in the prosecution of that design before he could bring it to execution. Thee were now nearly six hundred souls in this settlement.

This was done in pursuance of a scheme, proposed by Mr. Pury to the Assembly of South Carolina; his scheme was to propel the southern frontier of Carolina with brave and laborious people, such as the Swiss are known to be. The assembly highly approved of this scheme; to assist him in the execution of it, they passed an act, August 20, 1731, which secured to him a reward of £400, upon his bringing over to Carolina a hundred effective men. In this act the Assembly promised also to find provisions, tools, etc, for three hundred persons for one year. Purysburgh in 1747, contained more than one hundred houses tolerably well built.

In Colleton county, on the north bank of North Ediston river, 12 miles from its mouth, stands Wilton, or New London, consisting of 80 houses built by Swiss under the direction of Zuberbhuler, with leave from the Assembly. This town proved detrimental to Purysburgh, being in the heart of the county and near the capital; it drew people thither, who did not care to go to Purysburgh.

From 1740-1755, a great many Palatines were sent to South Carolina, They settled Orangeburg, Cougaree and Wateree. In 1765, upwards of six hundred from the Palatine and Swabia were sent over from London and had a township of land set apart for them.

In 1739, a number of Lutherans and German Reformed purchased a tract of land from General Waldo, and laid out the town Waldoborough, in Lincoln county, Maine. Bremen, a village in the same county, and Frankfort, in Waldo county, were undoubtedly laid out, or settled by Germans, as the names would indicate. During the Spanish and French War, in 1746, Waldoborough was laid in ashes by some Canadian Indians. Some of the inhabitants were massacred, others abducted. Not a few died from the ill-treatment received at the hands of the savages – some made their escape, and were dispersed in Canada. Waldoborough remained in ruins until 1750. In 1751, invited by those in authority, thirty German families, and in 1752, fifteen hundred individuals from Europe, persons of means, settled in Maine.

King George II of Great Britain, held out strong inducements, through very liberal promises, to all who would emigrate into, and settle Nova Scotia, when a considerable body of German, principally Hanoverians, left their country, embarked for America, landed at Chebucto Bay, near Halifax, the capital of Nova Scotia, where fourteen hundred and fifty-three re-embarked and landed at Marliguish, on the 7th of june, 1753. Here they laid out the flourishing town of Lundenburg. Here they were doomed to experience the same resistance from the natives which the colonists at Halifax had met with, in settling the Peninsula; and the early history of the place contains little else than a constant succession of struggles with the savages in which, notwithstanding the powerful protection they received from the government, they lost many lives. Their attempts at agriculture were therefore restricted within a very narrow compass, and the settlement of the adjoining country was retarded until the French power and influence in Nova Scotia were subdued.

From 1735, settlements in Pennsylvania multiplied rapidly; extended over vast regions, west of the Susquehanna, whither the Scotch-Irish had led the way. The German settlement kept pace with the native.

The Kau-ta-tn-chunk (Kittatiny or Blue Mountain) extending from the Delaware hundreds of miles westwards, was not an insurmountable barrier – that they crossed and laid out farms where shortly afterwards they, their wives and children, were exposed to the torch, hatchet and scalping knife of the savages, and their midnight assault and slaughter. Hundreds fell victims to the relentlessly cruel savage, along the Blue Mountains, south and north of them and along the Susquehanna, as far north as Penn’s Creek, from 1754-1763 and even at a later period. Among the massacred were many Germans – more than 300 in all.

Germans massacred, north of the Blue Mountain, within Monroe county, among other were: Guldin, Hoth or Huth, Bomper, Vanaken, Vanflor, Schnell, Hartman, Hage, Brundich, Hellman, Gonderman, Schleich, Muller, Vandelap, Decker, Van Gondie, Brinker. South and north of the same mountain, within the present limits of Northampton, Carbon and Lehigh – more than one hundred were killed. Among them were: Sohn, Klein, Bittenbender, Roth, Schaffer, Ancers, Nitschman, Senseman, Gattermyer, Fabricuius, Schwigert, Leslie, Presser, Depu.

Along the same mountain, within the limits of Berks, Lebanon and Dauphin county – Reichelsdorfer, Gerhart, Neidung, Klug, or Kluck, Linderman, Schott, Craushar, Zeissloff, Wunch, Dieppel, Henly, Spitler, Nocker, Maurer, Boshar, Fell, Kuhlmer, Lang, Trump, Yager, Sechler, Schetterly, Sauter, Geiger, Ditzler, Franz, Schnebele, Mosser, Fincher, Hubler, Marloff, Wolf, Handsche, Weisser, Miess, Lebenguth, Motz, Noah, Windelblech, Zeuchmacher, etc.

Prior to 1770, the wilderness of Pennsylvania was penetrated beyond the Allegheny Mountains. Settlements were effected within the present bounds of Westmoreland and other eastern counties of this state. A number of German families had located on the Monongahela as far up as Redstone, Brownsville, Fayette county. Here settled the Weismans, Pressers, Vervalsons, Delongs, Jungs, Martins, Shutts, Peters, Schwartz, Hutters, Cackeys, Abrahams, and others (the first Germans in Western Pennsylvania, located in Greene county. These were two brothers, the Eckerleins of Ephrata, who left there and settle in the depths of the wilderness in 1745. Prior to 1754, Wendel Braun, and his two sons, and Frederik Waltser, located four miles west of Uniontown.), whom that devoted minister of the cross, the Rev. John Conrad Bucher, visited in Nov 1768.

Palatine Passenger List Index

My Maternal German ancestors were Linderman and Jungs. Johann Jacob Linderman, born in1722 in Baden-Baden, Germany, emigrated on 25 August 1740 from Zweibrucken, Germany to Philadelphia, Pennsylvania and he settled in Germantown Township, Pennsylvania in December 1740.  His wife was Catherine McLean. Johann Jacob Linderman served in American Revolutionary War from 1777-1781 in Pennsylania. Johann & Catherine (McLean) Linderman had eleven children together.

MY QUILT MOTHER MADE FOR ME


I have been waiting patiently for this quilt to be made by Mother just for me. The other kids have theirs, and now I will soon get mine. I picked out the colors and patterns with Mother. Since, I love flowers and roses, of course it has them on it. The rose colors are my favorite. Every piece has been lovingly hand sewn together. Of course, I probably won’t allow anyone to sit or lay on it. [hand made by Jean Marie Linderman Frederick Mancill-finished 2010].  There is none other like it–it is UNIQUE like my Mother and Me.

My quilt by Mother