John Tudor, Jr. – Greenville, Pitts, North Carolina


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John Tudor Jr. 

Birth: 1720

Isle of Wight, Isle of Wight, Virginia, United States

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First Marriage: about 1748 Brunswick County, Virginia to Elizabeth Fraser
Second Marriage: about 1761 in Granville County, North Carolina to Elizabeth Seymour White
Third Marriage: before 1764 in Brunswick County, Virginia to Frances Phillips
 
Death

 

Granville County, North Carolina
Granville County is a county located in the U.S. state of North Carolina. As of the 2010 census, the population was 59,916. Its county seat is Oxford. Wikipedia
Burial: 
Non-Cemetery Burial Created by: Terri T 
Record added: Mar 20, 2016 
Find A Grave Memorial# 159792522

“JOHN TUDOR, SR. b. ca. 1695; d. ca. 1721. (A very young man). Little is known about John Tudor, SR. d. intestate 1771 in Surry Co., VA.. Inventory of his estate was filed under JOHN TEDDER in Surry Co., VA.. He left a widow named Mary and 2 young sons- Benjamin Tudor, and John Tudor, JR.

It is known that the widow Mary m2. to the co-administrator of the estate, Henry Rose, some months prior to the filing of the Inventory 1 Ap. 1721. Proof that he left 2 young sons comes from the Deeds & Estate records of Henry Rose, when he explains the relationship to his wife Mary, and refers to them as step-sons when he deeded land to them. John Tudor, SR. had modest household furnishings, some pewter, a Bible, and a Book of Common Prayer (suggesting a link to the Church of England), and shoemaker’s tools along with a ‘parcel of leather. (suggesting he had been a shoemaker by trade).

JOHN TUDOR JR. was b. ca 1720 ; d. 1782 Granville Co., N. C.. It is highly probable that he was born in VA.. He was born no later than 1720 and could have been born a few years earlier. It is believed that he spent his ‘growing up’ years in the Isle of Wight Co., VA.. The first record that we have of John Tudor, JR., is a deed to him from his step-father, Henry Rose, in Brunswick Vo., VA., dated 7 June, 1750, which states that both men were living in Brunswick Vo., VA.. Henry Rose deeded the remainder of the 342 acre tract of land in Brunswick Co., VA., but reserved interest for himself and his wife, Mary, to reside on the tract. Henry Rose died about 1752 and John Tudor, JR., remained in Brunswick Co., VA., until 1764, when he moved to Granville Co., N.C., with his own family and other TUDOR relatives. John Tudor, JR. m 1st Elizabeth [nee ???] 1749-69. There is no evidence to tell us what her maiden name was. There is evidence that she died before 1762. . and John Tudor, JR., married another Elizabeth. There is evidence that she was a daughter of Valentine White, and OUR TUDOR LINE traces to this Elizabeth. The 2nd Elizabeth was the mother of BLUMER TUDOR, our ancestor.

The children of John Tudor, JR., were: A. Phoebe Tudor, b, ca, 1750; m. John Morris. B. Henry Tudor, b. ca. 1752; d. by 1782; m. Nancy, C. John Tudor III, b. 1754, had a R/W pension. A R/W soldier who went to Madison Co., KY..

He m. 1st 1779 in Granville Co., N.C.; to Martha Search. He m. 2nd to Frances Phillips, m 3rd to Elizabeth White. These were the children of his 1st wife.

Children of his 2nd wife were: D. Valentine Tudor, b. 1764; m. Granville Co., N.C., to Elizabeth Hicks. Valentine Tudor had a R/W pension. E. Tabitha Tudor, b. 1766, m. 1784 Granville Co., N.C., to Pleasant Whitlow. F. Winefred Tudor, b. ca. 1769; m. James Long. G. BLUMER TUDOR, (our ancestor), b. 1770-72 Granville Co., N.C.; m. 21 May, 1795 in Madison Co., KY. to CHARITY TURNER. (more later). H. Daniel Tudor, b. 1774; m. Nancy Moberly. I. Anne Tudor, b. ca. 1777, m. Samuel Moberly.

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Madison County, Kentucky

During the migration in 1785-1787, the widow Elizabeth took her 6 youngest children to Madison Co., KY., with her eldest son Valentine & his family. There is evidence that some of her older children joined her there. She died in Madison Co., KY., amongst her children.”

source: 9 September 2015 by ColeScottCameron1

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John Tudor, Sr. – Denbigh, Clwyd, Wales


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denbigh-wales_castle

John Tudor, Sr.

Born: 1684 in Denbigh, Clwyd, Wales, United Kingdom.

Died: 1721 in Surry County, Virginia.

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Eastover Manor House on the James- 1800’s Plantation Home

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Married: 1717 to Mary Seat (aka Seate) in Isle of Wight, Virginia.

Children: John Jr. and Benjamin Tudor. 

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Surry County, Virginia is a county located in the Commonwealth of Virginia. Its county seat is Surry. In 1652, Surry County was formed from the portion of James City County south of the James River.Wikipedia

Image result for Surry Co., VA

“JOHN TUDOR, SR. b. ca. 1695; d. ca. 1721. (A very young man). Little is known about John Tudor, SR. d. intestate 1771 in Surry Co., VA.. Inventory of his estate was filed under JOHN TEDDER in Surry Co., VA.. He left a widow named Mary and 2 young sons- Benjamin Tudor, and John Tudor, Jr. It is known that the widow Mary m2. to the co-administrator of the estate, Henry Rose, some months prior to the filing of the Inventory 1 Ap. 1721. Proof that he left 2 young sons comes from the Deeds & Estate records of Henry Rose, when he explains the relationship to his wife Mary, and refers to them as step-sons when he deeded land to them. John Tudor, SR. had modest household furnishings, some pewter, a Bible, and a Book of Common Prayer (suggesting a link to the Church of England), and shoemaker’s tools along with a ‘parcel of leather. (suggesting he had been a shoemaker by trade).

JOHN TUDOR JR. was b. ca 1720 ; d. 1782 Granville Co., N. C.. It is highly probable that he was born in VA.. He was born no later than 1720 and could have been born a few years earlier. It is believed that he spent his ‘growing up’ years in the Isle of Wight Co., VA. The first record that we have of John Tudor, JR., is a deed to him from his step-father, Henry Rose, in Brunswick, VA, dated 7 June, 1750, which states that both men were living in Brunswick, VA. 

Henry Rose deeded the remainder of the 342 acre tract of land in Brunswick, VA. but reserved interest for himself and his wife, Mary, to reside on the tract. Henry Rose died about 1752 and John Tudor, JR., remained in Brunswick Co., VA., until 1764, when he moved to Granville Co., N.C., with his own family and other TUDOR relatives. John Tudor, JR. m 1st Elizabeth [nee ???] 1749-69. There is no evidence to tell us what her maiden name was. There is evidence that she died before 1762. . and John Tudor, JR., married another Elizabeth Seymour White. There is evidence that she was a daughter of Valentine White, and OUR TUDOR LINE traces to this Elizabeth. The 2nd Elizabeth was the mother of BLUMER TUDOR, our ancestor.

The children of John Tudor, JR., were: A. Phoebe Tudor, b, ca, 1750; m. John Morris. B. Henry Tudor, b. ca. 1752; d. by 1782; m. Nancy, C. John Tudor III, b. 1754, had a R/W pension. A R/W soldier who went to Madison Co., KY..

He m. 1st 1779 in Granville, N.C.; to Martha Search. He m. 2nd to Frances Phillips, m 3rd to Elizabeth White. These were the children of his 1st wife.

Children of his 2nd wife were: D. Valentine Tudor, b. 1764; m. Granville Co., N.C., to Elizabeth Hicks. Valentine Tudor had a R/W pension. E. Tabitha Tudor, b. 1766, m. 1784 Granville Co., N.C., to Pleasant Whitlow. F. Winifred Tudor, b. ca. 1769; m. James Long. G. BLUMER TUDOR, (our ancestor), b. 1770-72 Granville Co., N.C.; m. 21 May, 1795 in Madison Co., KY. to CHARITY TURNER. (more later). H. Daniel Tudor, b. 1774; m. Nancy Moberly. I. Anne Tudor, b. ca. 1777, m. Samuel Moberly. During the migration in 1785-1787, the widow Elizabeth took her 6 youngest children to Madison Co., KY., with her eldest son Valentine & his family. There is evidence that some of her older children joined her there. She died in Madison Co., KY., amongst her children.”

source: 9 September 2015 by ColeScottCameron1, FamilySearch.org Website

 

 

 

Linderman Family Genealogy~Dubuque, Iowa


705 W. Third Street, Dubuque, Iowa 52001

Home built by E. F. Linderman & Gudrun Ivara (Lund) Linderman

Edward Francis Linderman, 705 W. Third Street, Dubuque, Iowa

Shirley, Jimmie, Dickie, Gladys, and Edward Linderman~World War II~Dubuque, Iowa

Written by Roy Leonard “Jimmie” Nelson, Jr.

“Winter school work done in dining room next to coal burning pot belly stove. Heavy drapes to close living room off. House heated by registers, water circulated by furnace in basement. Coal storage room in basement to be hand fed to furnace. Sometime during W.W. II Grandpa had the furnace converted to oil fed. In the basement there was a vegetable room for canned foods, sacks of potatoes, and bags of sugar, etc…

There was a double sink to wash clothes, and one sink had a wringer. There was a four burner stove to heat copper boiler for washing clothes (hot water). Basement foundation large stones. They were white washed every summer.

Three bedrooms upstairs. Me & Grandpa across from each other, bathroom head of the stairs. Mom & Shirley & Dickie on cot in front bedroom and stairs to divided attic, basement, main floor, and upstairs attic.

Backyard, wall with 2 car garage one for storage & one for Grandpa’s 1937 Buick, 2 door. In the winter grandpa would take battery to basement to charge. He would open the door while he charged battery & run motor for a while to circulate motor.

During W.W. II Grandpa had the s/w radio on all day long so we knew what part of the world the fighting was going on. He got the Chicago Tribune with all of the war locations, etc.

When Grandpa was listening to the radio, reading, he used to roll Prince Albert out of the can. He smoked for years, he just up and quit.

3rd. Street was one of the steepest streets in Dubuque & Grandpa walked it after going downtown to the Stock Market. One day it got his wind, so doctor told him to stop smoking & he did.

Grandpa was a Jehovah’s Witness, a real bible study man. He knew a little about everything, a very smart man.

He did not like kids for years. Grandpa was a very frugal man because money was very tight when he grew up.

His lifetime employment was with the government out of Rock Island, Illinois. He used to cut down trees to use as wing dams to help control the Mississippi Spring floods. Later government dams to help control the floods from Minnesota to New Orleans, Louisiana.

Grandpa worked his way up to barge inventory from Rock Island, the main office still there today. Rock Island, Illinois Munitions Factory, is the only one on the river that still makes our machine gun bullets and bombs.

He got Uncle Arturo “Art” Ayala a job with the Rhode Island office. “Ari” started out sweeping floors & after many years worked his way up to Lock Master – Lock & Dam III- Dubuque, Iowa. That was neat because we could walk the dam to Wisconsin side. Pretty neat to see all of that water rushing through the locks.

When we were young, family and friends would catch a bus up to Eagle Point Park. It was beautiful place with lots of room for kids to play. Beautiful rock gardens, tennis courts, etc. There are several lookout places so you can see this Mississippi, Wisconsin & Illinois & Eppie & Art Ayala’s government house at the Lock & Dam. Good old days. That was quite a treat!

Grandpa turned out to be a very interesting person with contact with a variety of people. Before us kids came along, Grandpa had done a lot of traveling thru the Midwest, and Hot Springs, Arkansas. Surprise for me.

After I got out of the service (Korea period), 1950-1953, grandpa had changed & became the kind of person you’d want to visit with. Lucky me.”

Sol Ross “Conrad” Tudor~~English And Scottish Ancestors


Sol Ross and Leonard Ross Tudor, 1956, Stephenville, TexasStephenville, TX

(from left to right) Ann & Wayne Tudor, (middle row) Anita, Gladys, Len, Steve, Don, Ross, and Wayne Tudor, 1961, Stephenville, Erath County, Texas, Don, Wayne, and Ross Tudor, 1961 (last row) Sol Ross Tudor, and Donald Raymond Tudor, 1961, Stephenville, Erath County, Texas.
Wayne Tudor with children: Len, Don, Anita, and Steve, Texas, 1961

courtesy of Annie Mae (McCann)Tudor, June 2014

ComancheTexasBankBuilding702

Sol Ross “Conrad” Tudor
 
Birth: Jul. 5, 1890
Stephenville
Erath County
Texas, USA
Death: Dec. 31, 1968
Stephenville
Erath County
Texas, USA

On double marker with Bergie M. Tudor (1899-1941)
Married Bergie Mae (Mobley) on 6 March 1918 in Erath County, Texas.Resided in Stephenville, Erath County, Texas from 1890-1968.

He was the son of Thomas Benton “T.B.” Tudor and Sallie Hampton (Keith) Tudor of Tippah County, Mississippi.Sol and Bergie had 4 children together: Leonard Doyle, Raymond Horton, Mae Corrine (Williams), and Donald Wayne Tudor.
Sol was a farmer and Bergie was a homemaker.My husband, Leonard Ross Tudor, was named after his Paternal Grandfather, Sol Ross Tudor, also known as Conrad, and his uncle Leonard.

name: Ross Sol Tudor
event: Draft Registration
event date: 1942
event place: Stephenville, Erath, Texas
gender: Male
birth date: 05 Jul 1890
nara publication title: World War II Draft Cards (4th Registration) for the State of Texas
nara publication number:  
arc identifier: 576252
film number: 4161310
digital folder number: 004161310
image number: 02842
Citing this Record
“United States, World War II Draft Registration Cards, 1942,” index and images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.1.1/XP51-G6B : accessed 10 Feb 2013), Ross Sol Tudor, 1942; citing NARA microfilm publications M1939, M1936, and M1937; FHL microfilm 4161310.

1920 Census for Stephenville, Erath County, Texas records: SOL ROSS TUDOR, M, W, AGE 29, MARRIED, TEXAS, FARMER, FATHER BORN IN MISSISSIPPI, MOTHER BORN IN TENNESSEE.

S. ROSS TUDOR, DISTRICT 1, STEPHENVILLE, ERATH COUNTY, TEXAS, AGE 39, BORN IN TEXAS, MARRIED AT 27, WHITE, MALE, PARENTS BOTH BORN IN MISSISSIPPI, CLERK IN HOTEL, OWNED HOME WORTH $1500.

name:S Ross Tudor
event:Census
event date:1930
event place:Stephenville, Erath, Texas
gender:Male
age:39
marital status:Married
race:White
birthplace:Texas
estimated birth year:1891
immigration year:
relationship to head of household:Head
father’s birthplace:Mississippi
mother’s birthplace:Mississippi
enumeration district number:0001
family number:124
sheet number and letter:5A
line number:50
nara publication:T626, roll 2326
film number:2342060
digital folder number:4547949
image number:00080
HouseholdGenderAgeBirthplace
headS Ross TudorM39Texas
wifeBergie M TudorF30Texas
sonLenord D TudorM11Texas
sonRaymond H TudorM7Texas
daughterMarge C TudorF3Texas
sonDonald W TudorM2Texas

Family links:
Parents:
Thomas Benton Tudor (1842 – 1917)
Sallie Hampton Keith Tudor (1845 – 1924)

Spouse:
Bergie Mae Mobley Tudor (1899 – 1941)*

Children:
Raymond Horton Tudor (1922 – 2001)*
Corinne Mae Tudor Williams (1926 – 1992)*
Donald Wayne Tudor (1927 – 2012)*

Burial:
West End Cemetery
Stephenville
Erath County
Texas, USA
 
Maintained by: TEXAS TUDORS
Originally Created by: Ken Jones
Record added: Jul 29, 2006
Find A Grave Memorial# 15078889

Related articles

Donald Wayne Tudor~~Stephenville, Erath County, Texas (texastudorsmemorials.wordpress.com)
Thomas Benton “T.B.” Tudor~Southern Heroes (texastudorsmemorials.wordpress.com)

Our Roots In Europe~German, Moravian, Luxembourgish, Norwegian, Scottish, Irish, and English


Europe [1] encompasses an area of 10,180,000 km2 (3,930,000 square miles), stretching from Asia to the Atlantic, and from Africa to the Arctic. European countries welcome more than 480 million international visitors per year, more than half of the global market, and 7 of the 10 most visited countries are European nations. It’s easy to see why – a well preserved cultural heritage, open borders and efficient infrastructure makes visiting Europe a breeze, and rarely will you have to travel more than a few hours before you can immerse yourself in a new culture, and dive into a different phrasebook. Although it is the world’s second smallest continent in land surface area, there are profound differences between the cultures and ways of life in its countries.

Europe consists of a diverse set of countries that each have their own identity, language and culture. Below is a rough grouping of these countries into regions:

Map of Europe’s regions

  Balkans (Albania, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Bulgaria, Croatia, Kosovo, Republic of Macedonia, Moldova, Montenegro, Romania, Serbia, Transnistria)
The Balkans have a rich, though often turbulent, history with wonderful nature, charming multicultural towns, impressive monasteries and citadels dotting the hillsides, mighty mountains sprinkled with a liberal dose of beautiful forests and pleasant lakes.

Baltic states (Estonia, Latvia, Lithuania)
Three fascinating states that have glorious beaches along an extensive coastline, medieval old towns, and beautiful natural scenery. Estonia has linguistic and cultural ties with Finland.
Benelux (Belgium, Luxembourg, Netherlands)
These supposedly flat states have a lot to offer the traveller. The Netherlands is known for its clogs, cheese, tulips and windmills, and for its liberal attitudes and painters. Belgium is a multilingual country with beautiful historic cities, bordering Luxembourg at the rolling hills of the Ardennes.

Britain and Ireland (Guernsey, Ireland, Isle of Man, Jersey, United Kingdom)
Britain is a diverse patchwork of native and immigrant cultures, possessing a fascinating history and dynamic modern culture, both of which remain hugely influential in the wider world. Ireland has rolling landscapes and characteristic customs, traditions and folklore.
Caucasus (Armenia, Azerbaijan, Georgia)
The Caucasus is a mountain range lying between the Black Sea and the Caspian Sea, considered part of the natural boundary between Europe and Asia. The Caucasus is a dense, warm, friendly and generally safe travel region. There are some incredibly diverse landscapes and an exceptional wealth of ancient churches, cathedrals and monasteries.
Central Europe (Austria, Czech Republic, Germany, Hungary, Liechtenstein, Poland, Slovakia, Slovenia, Switzerland)
Straddling east and west, Central Europe is the region where Germanic culture meets Slavic culture. It is home to innumerable historic towns, fairy-tale castles, beer, forests, unspoiled farmland, and plenty of mountain ranges, including the mighty Alps.
France and Monaco
The world’s most popular tourist destination and geographically one of the most diverse countries of Europe. Some of its tourist attractions include Paris, the French Riviera, the Atlantic beaches, the winter sports resorts of the Alps, the castles of the Loire Valley, Brittany and Normandy, and the rural landscape of the Provence. The country is also known for its gastronomy (particularly wines and cheeses), history, culture and fashion.
Greece, Turkey, and Cyprus
Counting the most amount of sun-hours in Europe, the Eastern Mediterranean is a haven for beach-goers, party-people and cultural enthusiasts alike.
Iberia (Andorra, Gibraltar, Portugal, SpainThe Iberian countries are great destinations for their rich and unique cultures, lively cities, beautiful countryside and friendly inhabitants.

Italian Peninsula (Italy, Malta, San Marino, Vatican City)
Rome, Florence, Venice and Pisa are on many travellers’ itineraries, but these are just a few of Italy’s destinations. Italy has more history and culture packed into it than many other countries combined.
Russia, Ukraine, and Belarus
Russia is a country of vast, empty expanses that spans all the way east to the Pacific Ocean. Ukraine is a diverse country that has a lot to offer, from the beach resorts of the Black Sea to the beautiful cities Odessa, Lviv and Kiev. North of Ukraine lies Belarus, a country unlike anywhere else, commonly referred to as the last dictatorship of Europe.
Scandinavia and the Nordics (Denmark, Faroe Islands, Finland, Iceland, Norway, Sweden)
Spectacular scenery of mountains, lakes, glaciers, geysers, waterfalls and volcanoes. Finland is culturally distinct as it has a language unlike the Scandinavian languages.
See also: European microstates

Politically, some countries are a member of the European Union, a supranational and intergovernmental union that aims to integrate the states of Europe in a common political framework. However, Europe is a diverse region and countries have varying ideas of potential membership — some with no intention of joining at all. The eastern border of Europe is ill-defined. Parts of Russia, Turkey and the Caucasus are sometimes considered to be a part of Asia due to culture, history and geography.

Central Europe~~Land of My German and Moravian-Czech Ancestors


Central Europe

Central Europe is a region forming the heart of Europe. It includes the German-speaking countries, four former Warsaw Pact member states that have successfully joined the European Union, and Slovenia, a former Yugoslav republic, now also a member of the EU. Only Switzerland and tiny Liechtenstein are not EU member states but share close economic and cultural ties with the region but also have stayed away largely for economic and historical reasons. It is a large and important region stretching from the Baltic and North Sea in the north to the Adriatic in the south. It is also home to some of Europe’s and the world’s most prosperous economies and cities. Lastly, it includes the fabled mountain range of the Alps which acts a transition zone between the latin, germanic and slavic cultures which all call the region home.

Countries

Austria
The Alps, historic cities and villages, and a wealth of cultural attractions
Czech Republic
Beautiful forests and mountains, and some of the most notable architectural attractions in Europe
Germany

Hungary

 

Liechtenstein
Tiny state which is a financial centre as well as having some picture-postcard scenery

 

Poland
Formerly the sleeping giant of Europe, modern-day Poland is a thriving nation with important national parks and countless historical attractions

 

Slovakia
Slavic region formerly best known as High Hungary, after WW I part of Czechoslovakia, sovereign since 1993. Interesting for its countryside, especially the Tatra Mountains.

 

Slovenia
Often called the miniature Europe, it is on the crossroads of the Slavic, Germanic and the Romanic world.

 

Switzerland

 

Cities

Central Europe has some of the oldest and best preserved cities on the continent. Below is a list of nine of the most notable:

 

  • Berlin — the capital of reunited Germany since 1990, it was divided by force for 45 years during the Cold War; it has emerged as a international cultural centre and an area of rapid development since the fall of the Berlin Wall.
  • Bratislava – the political, cultural, and economic centre of Slovakia with beautiful historical buildings in the old town.
  • Budapest — a wealth of grand architecture, culture and its famous thermal baths, as well as one of the oldest metro systems in the world.
  • Geneva — a wealthy urban banking centre that is home to many international agencies like the Red Cross and the United Nations.
  • Ljubljana — picturesque alpine capital of Slovenia, a charming baroque city with stunning architecture and dynamic nightlife.
  • Munich — the well to do capital of the southern German federal-state of Bavaria, this gateway to the Alps is famous for Oktoberfest, the world’s largest beer festival.
  • Prague — one of Europe’s most attractive and well preserved large cities and has emerged as an expatriate melting pot since the opening of the Iron Curtain.

The economic powerhouse of Europe with major metropolitan cities and some lovely countryside.

Other destinations

  • Alps — probably one of the most important winter destinations in the world, that is home to summer resorts too
  • Baltic Sea Coast — Germany and Poland share the Baltic Sea coast of Central Europe with hundreds of miles of sandy beaches and resorts
  • Białowieża National Park — a huge area of ancient woodland in Poland designated as a UNESCO World Heritage Site
  • Black Forest — smaller mountain range in southwest Germany famous for its scenery and history
  • East Frisian Islands — Germany has many tourist islands in the North Sea
  • Lake Balaton — this scenic Hungarian lake is the largest lake in Central Europe and a year-round tourist hub
  • Neuschwanstein Castle — the well-known fairy-tale castle in the Bavarian Alps in Germany
  • Romantic Road — a popular tourist route through historical towns and romantic castles in Southern Germany
  • Vysoké Tatry — beautiful and unspoiled mountain range peaking at 2600 meters above sea level

Castles appearing straight out of fairy tales dot the entire landscape of Central Europe. Pictured here is Schloss Neuschwanstein near Füssen, Germany.

While ethnically different, the countries of Central Europe share a similar culture and history throughout the ages. Two of the most important political units in the region were the German and Austro-Hungarian empires. They were preceded in the Middle Ages by the Holy Roman Empire, a patchwork of states and statelets whose extent varied over time. Ethnic conflict was a major problem for hundreds of years in Central Europe and culminated in the horrors of the Second World War. With the peaceful reunification of Germany and the recent expansion of the EU to encompass the former Warsaw Pact states in the region, this problem finally seems to have been solved.

It is a common mistake by outsiders to label all the former Warsaw Pact states in the region as being in Eastern Europe. Almost uniformly, inhabitants of Central Europe will be flattered and pleased if you correctly describe their countries as “central European” both geographically and culturally. Conversely, they may be upset if you lapse into Cold War stereotypes. East and West Germany were countries, so better to call it eastern and western Germany. Reunification is all but a thing of the past and seen in a more or less positive light by most there and in all of Central Europe so try to avoid labeling Germans by their recent past. Remember Germans are Germans but Austrians, Liechtensteiners and most Swiss and Luxembourgers all speak German, but are not German! Czech, Polish or Slovakian may sound similar to Russian, but inhabitants of these countries will not take kindly to assumptions of cultural overlap. Lastly, keep in mind that the Czech Republic and Slovakia once shared a country as well and Slovaks in general are very proud of their new found independence.

While they are not currently considered part of Central Europe, the regions of western Ukraine, Kaliningrad Oblast (Russia), Alsace and parts of Lorraine (France), and South Tyrol/Alto-Adige province (Italy), are sometimes also considered Central European. This is due either to their current and or past ethnic makeup and/or previous political histories. The Kaliningrad oblast spent most of its history as a German speaking region and South Tirol remains a largely German-speaking region in northern Italy maintaining strong cultural ties to Austria. Even though Ukraine is predominantly an orthodox country, its westernmost part for the centuries was part of the Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealth and later passed to Austria-Hungary which to some extent influenced it’s unique culture.

Talk

Central Europe, because of its rich heritage of nationalities, likewise is home to many languages. Some languages enjoy national status and thus are taught in schools and used widely in the media. Others however are only regional languages or minority languages and thus are sadly in danger of eventual extinction even though efforts are underway to try to preserve them.

German has the largest number of native speakers in the region and acts as the single “official” language of Austria, Germany and Liechtenstein. In Switzerland, German is the mother tongue of 2/3 of the population and the dominant language of the four official Swiss languages (German, French, Italian & Romansh). There is a small German speaking minority to be found in Poland, Czech Republic and Hungary. It is also spoken outside Central Europe in eastern Belgium and France, and northern Italy (mainly in the region of South Tyrol/Alto Adige). German can be very diverse and appears in many different colorful dialects particular in the Southern German-speaking world (Southern Germany, Austria, Switzerland, Liechtenstein and South Tyrol) were tradition and dialect remains strong.

Czech and Slovak are very closely related and are mutually intelligible. The Sorbian language(s) spoken in eastern Germany near the Polish frontier is also a close relative.

Polish is the dominant language in all regions of Poland. Kashubian, a regional Slavonic language, is spoken in the region around Gdansk in Pomerania in northern Poland. Silesian is a regional language/dialect, (depending on who you ask) found in southwest Poland.

Hungarian is one of the most difficult languages for other Europeans to learn, as it originates from a different language family and is related to Finnish and Estonian. There are 5 million Hungarian speakers living outside Hungary in neighboring countries such as Romania (Transylvania), northern Serbia, eastern Austria and southern Slovakia.

French or Italian are spoken by the majority of the population in the southern and western regions of Switzerland, while Swiss German is commonly taught as a second language. French plays a historic role in alpine northern Italy in the French border regions.

In the Swiss Canton of Graubünden or Grison, Romansh is spoken as a regional language. Almost all Romansh speakers speak either Swiss German and/or Italian as well. It is closely related to Ladin which is spoken in a few mountain valleys of northern Italy and is another endangered regional language. Sadly it is being replaced by German or Italian.

Slovenian is the official language of Slovenia, but it is also spoken by the Slovenian minorities in southern Austria, northeastern Italy and western Hungary. There is also a small Croatian minority in Austria’s Burgenland. Sorbian, Frisian and Low German are Germany’s three native minority languages with exception of Roma. Sorbian is related to Polish and Czech and can be found spoken in both the eastern states of Saxony and Brandenburg. All Sorbs speak German as well and the current Minister President (Governor) of the German federal-state of Saxony is even Sorbian! Frisian is related to English and Dutch and is spoken by tiny minority communities in Schleswig-Holstein and Niedersachsen and neighboring communities in the Netherlands.

Lastly, Low German is spoken by rural communities or as a second language by a few in most federal states of northern Germany and still has a significant role to play in the city states of Bremen, Hamburg and Luebeck and in the states of Niedersachsen, Schleswig-Holstein and particular in the eastern federal-state of Mecklenburg-Western Pomerania. All three German minority languages are endangered languages. Efforts are underway to preserve the languages and their culture but it is seemingly a losing battle.

Finding people who speak and understand English is not a problem in most regions of Central Europe, especially in Switzerland, Austria and Germany. In Poland, Slovenia, Slovakia, Hungary and the Czech Republic, English is widely spoken in the larger cities and by younger people; German and Russian are also spoken and understood by many older people in these countries. Russian, since the end of the Cold War and the unification of Europe is in steady decline. Today German remains important, more for financial and economic reasons instead of cultural or political reasons, as was the case in the past. Slovenians and the Swiss by far lead the region in their ability to speak many different tongues.

Santa Claus Is Coming To Town~~My Wonderful Memories of Jacinto City, Texas


old-fashioned-santa-claus

I grew up and was raised in the little suburb of Houston, Jacinto City, Harris County, Texas in the sixties. Times were much slower, safer, and more sentimental back then. Families were closer. My Mother and Father, Leroy & Jean (Linderman) Frederick had six children, Joseph, Phyllis, Sally, Karl, Patricia, and Sarah Frederick, in a little frame house with two bedrooms and one bath. Many arguments took place over who was next in the bathroom. Thank God, Daddy knew how to do anything. He added a huge bedroom and bath onto the back of our house for him and mother. We four girls had to share a bedroom. My two brothers had their own room. I can still remember those rooms. Our room had a big picture window, and faced the street. The boys had a smaller room and faced the backyard.

It was a really small house, and we were a very close knit family. We were raised Methodist. We fought but we always forgave each other, because we were family and that is what we were taught that family did.  Thank God, that is what mother taught us, that you only have one family, and love was unconditional. No matter how angry we made  each other.

My mother and daddy always made holidays special. Daddy put up all the lights, and put up the tree, and mother and all of us children decorated the tree. It was always an old fashioned red and green Christmas. We were taught that Jesus was the reason for the season. We always had a nativity scene.

Jean & Lou Mancill, Manger Scene

We had Advent Calendars. We always attended the midnight service on Christmas Eve. We always watched “It’s a Wonderful Life” together. We had fudge, Cherry Wink cookies, food, food, food, and usually ham because we had turkey at Thanksgiving. It was a family affair, and everyone had their jobs, and everything had a place. Mother was an excellent homemaker. She taught all of us girls how to cook, sew, and clean. 

I wish that everyone could have the wonderful, old-fashioned Christmas’ that we had. I know without a doubt, that this world would be a much better if there were more God, Jesus, and Godly families.

Santa Claus on firetruck, Jacinto City, TX

We believed in Santa Claus, and were always so excited when Santa Claus came down our street on the firetruck before Christmas. We knew that he wasn’t the real Santa, mother told us that he was Santa’s helpers, because he was too busy delivering presents to visit everyone. We each got a stocking full of candy. We loved candy! 

Christmas Stockings

We each had our own stocking full of fruit, nuts, and candy, even mother and daddy. We had no fireplace, so we hung them on the wall. Mother had the Sears catalog for us to look at and dream about what all Santa was going to bring us. She had us circle the things that we wanted. Then she had us go back and pick only ten things that we wanted. We always got most of what was on our lists. My favorite smell is of a real tree, and my new baby dolls. I loved books even then. I loved the smell of new books. I always got at least one baby doll, books, and mother and daddy gave us clothes, or things we needed. As I got older, I had to have Barbie, Ken, Allen, Midge dolls, and all their clothes and house. I loved to read and write even as a little girl.

Even at 58, I still have my dolls, books, and teddy bears. 

Christmas Tree, Dec. 8, 2012

Mother nurtured my love for books and reading. She taught us the correct way to spell, by making us read the Dictionary and playing Scrabble. Her work was never done, and daddy worked all the time. If he was not at work, then he was working in our yard. We always had one of the most beautiful yards in our neighborhood. We lived at 1709 Cheston Drive, Jacinto City, Texas. We had loads of neighbors and we were all close with them. We played lots of games together like “kick ball”, football, baseball, and “hide and seek”. Someone was always having a birthday party. We had lots of parties. We celebrated life. Daddy was an excellent cook too, and made the best barbecue chicken ever. He made his own barbecue sauce. He loved Worcestershire sauce

We visited our maternal grandparents on Christmas Eve, Santa came on Christmas morning, and then we still had Christmas night to look forward to at my paternal grandmother‘s house. My paternal grandmother, Elizabeth Annie “Bessie” (Mazac) Frederick, was really poor and had very little materially, but she always had sweets and soda pop for us. She made the best Kolaches because she was Moravian. She always had something small for us to open. We were so excited to bring our Christmas presents to show off to grandma Bessie. She was a Widow and raised five children on her own. My paternal grandfather died before mother and daddy married, so I never got the chance to know him. She was a Custodian for the Crosby ISD for years. She loved her family and lived for them. She was Catholic and attended mass regularly. 

We were richly blessed to be born at that time in Texas and America. The best country in the world to live in, even with all the corruption in our politicians. We need to elect more Godly people to run our country. God bless America. God save America.

Mother And I Loved Old Trees With Character


Me And Mother Loved Old Trees With Character. She told me how her Mother would take all four of her girls for a walk in the woods, and she would point out different colored leaves, and trees with character. She told me that she didn’t want to walk. Her Mother would drop them off and make them walk back to the car. Her Mother pointed out an old dead tree, and how beautiful it was. Mother would whine that she didn’t see nothing beautiful just an old dead tree. My Grandmother was a fan of Ralph Waldo Emerson.  She tried to get her children interested in finding the good in things, and love of nature.

Mother did the same to us, and I was the one whining about I didn’t want to walk, and that I didn’t see anything beautiful about an old dead tree.

Near the end of Mother’s life she told me that story of her Mother, and I told her that I understood because I felt the same way when I was younger. Today, I think all of God’s nature is beautiful, even the dead leaves, plants, and trees. There is a season and time for everything.

When I was in high school English my teacher made us memorize a poem, and then we would have to read it aloud. I chose the one, “There is none so lovely as a Tree…”

Trees

I think that I shall never see
A poem lovely as a tree.
A tree whose hungry mouth is prest
Against the earth’s sweet flowing breast;
A tree that looks at God all day
And lifts her leafy arms to pray;
A tree that may in summer wear
A nest of robins in her hair;
Upon whose bosom snow has lain;
Who intimately lives with rain
Poems are made by fools like me
But only God can make a tree.

— Joyce Kilmer

I always loved trees. I was a tomboy, I climbed up into the tree to escape my little brother and sisters, and to keep them from bugging me. I dreamed of my Daddy building me a Tree house to play in.

NONE OF THEM FOUGHT FOR SOCIALISM OR COMMUNISM!! WE MUST SAVE AMERICA, AND HONOR THEIR MEMORIES!


Both my paternal and maternal grandparents were all good, hard working, Catholics, and American Patriots!

My fifth Great Grandfather, Johann Jacob Linderman helped to form these United States in the Revolutionary War in Pennsylvania. My third Great Grandfather, Abraham Linderman fought in the Civil War, and lost his eighteen year old son to the war. My Paternal Grandfather, Charles Frederick, fought in World War I, my Fathers and my Uncles fought in World War II.

My Brother, Joseph Frederick fought in Korea!

My nephews have both fought in Afghanistan in the Marines and the Army!

NONE OF THEM FOUGHT FOR SOCIALISM OR COMMUNISM!! WE MUST SAVE AMERICA, AND HONOR THEIR MEMORIES!

The life and family of the Quaker William Penn

Following from my recent post on the life of William Penn’s grandparents, Giles and Jeanne Penn, here are images from Spring 2012 of the Grade 1 listed Minety Church. This is the church where William Penn of Mintey, the great-grandfather of the Quaker, William Penn, is reputed to be buried before the altar.

Mintey is a beautiful, rural Wiltshire village and the key that opens the church (Grade 1 listed and built c.1450 on Anglo-Saxon foundations)  is something else.

Interestingly, in 1676 there were 16 people in the parish of Minety who were recorded as being non-conformist.

A full history of the church of St Leonard is available here.

View original post

RAYMOND JOSEPH CHRIST


 Raymond Joseph Christ
 
Birth: May 19, 1934
Sheldon
Harris County
Texas, USA
Death: Sep. 11, 2012
Houston
Harris County
Texas, USA 

Grandparents: Emil Christ and Antonia “Tony” (Janisch) Christ.
Parents: Edward “Eddie” John Christ and Agnes Rainie (Frederick) Christ.
They were the parents of one daughter, Peggy Gene Christ, who died in infancy, in 1945, and one son, Raymond Joseph Christ.
First wife: Jo Ann (Jones) Bennett, married on 24 December 1958, in Houston, Harris County, Texas.
Raymond adopted her 3 yr. old daughter, Teri Nell Bennett. Raymond and Jo Ann had two girls together, Brenda Lee (Sternthal)and Jessica Renee Sanders).
They resided in Royalwood subdivision off Hwy. 90A, Houston, Texas 77049.
Raymond was a veteran of the U.S. Army.
Raymond and Jo Ann divorced in 1976.
Second wife: Barbara Lynn Martin, on 23 September 1983, in Harris County, Texas.
No children from that marriage.
Raymond is survived by his second wife, Barbara Lynn.
His three daughters, Teri Nell (Nelson), Brenda Lee (Sternthal), and Jessica Renee (Sanders).CLAYTON FUNERAL HOME OBIT:Raymond Joseph Christ, 78, passed away on September 11, 2012. He is preceded in death by his parents, Edward and Agnes Christ; and sister, Peggy Gene Christ. Ray is survived by his loving wife of 29 years, Barbara Christ; step sons, Robert Rowlett, Andy Rowlett and his wife, Becky; daughters, Teri Nell Christ (Nelson), Brenda Christ (Sternthal) and her husband, Rich, Renee Christ (Sanders), and her husband, Gene; grandchildren, Kenneth, Craig, Amy, Cortni, Britney, Jill, Dana, Baylor, and Nicole; great grandchildren, Gabby, Gavin, Garrett, Grace, Victoria, Hunter, Landon, and Carson; and a host of other family and friends.A visitation for Ray will be held on Thursday, September 13, 2012 from 6:00 until 8:00 pm at Clayton Funeral Home, 5530 W. Broadway, Pearland, Texas 77581. The funeral service will be held on Friday, September 14, 2012 at 11:00 am at Clayton Funeral Home with Pastor Keith Anderson officiating. Interment with military honors will be on Monday, September, 17, 2012 at 2:00 pm at Houston National Cemetery, 10410 Veterans Memorial Drive – Houston, TX77038.http://www.claytonfuneralhomes.com/obits/More pics and info will be added as time allows.Parents:
Edward John Christ (1909 – 1982)
Agnes Rainie Frederick Christ (1914 – 2009)
Burial:
Houston National Cemetery
Houston
Harris County
Texas, USA
Created by: TEXAS TUDORS
Record added: Sep 11, 2012
Find A Grave Memorial# 96894803

Top Ten Free Genealogy Websites To Find Ancestors


  • The Top 10 Free Genealogy Websites to Find Your Ancestors

  • June 15, 2009
  • By Ryan Dube
  • A few years ago, during a family reunion, I learned for the first time that my granduncle on my father’s side had fought and died in World War II. The story of his demise sparked a personal interest toward my own family history.So, I did what I always do when I have something to research – I turned to the Internet. I quickly discovered that while there are certainly free genealogy websites out there, the truly valuable or unique ones are few and far between.

    During this research, I learned two things about people interested in genealogy. First, many of them are clearly not web page designers. Second, they really, really love links.

Without exaggerating, there are thousands of genealogy websites out there. MakeUseOf has touched on genealogy resources before – such as Mackenzie’s review of the GRAMPS software that lets you track your research, or Kinshuk’s review of the Kindo family tree building tool. When it comes to genealogy websites, they mostly all seem to be nothing more than lists of links to other resources.

Occasionally you’ll find a truly useful website with a search feature that accesses real data. For the purpose of this article, I will provide a list of the top 10 free genealogy websites that would be most valuable to anyone first entering into the hobby. These sites provide valuable tools, guides and access to databases that are overflowing with historic data.

During this research, I learned two things about people interested in genealogy. First, many of them are clearly not web page designers. Second, they really, really love links.

10. KindredTrails.com – Lots of Links to Valuable Resources

genealogy

There are two things that mark KindredTrails as a “typical” genealogy website. The first is that there are links to Ancestry.com on almost every page. This seems like a sort of pandemic with genealogy sites.

Secondly, like most other ancestry sites, KindredTrails is very much a link-oriented site. However, it does make it onto the top ten list because the site is well designed, the links are well organized. Additionally, the links provided on this site are very useful and valuable.

9. Access Genealogy.com – A Great Mix of Research Resources

genealogy2Access Genealogy is up a notch from the typical ancestry website. Its main page is pleasantly clean and well organized. Along the left side you’ll find links to some of the most unique research sources including charts, links to old letters, military records, native american records and much more.

One of the more fascinating resources here are the transcribed cemetary records. There are researchers in every State around the U.S. that walk through the oldest cemetaries and actually transcribe names along with birthdates, date of death and family members. This resource alone will hold your interest for hours.

8. The Olive Tree – The Starting Point for Any Amateur Researcher

genealogy3

Olive Tree Genealogy is another private researcher’s website holding a collection of links and resources for historical data. One thing that sets this site apart from others is that it’s apparent a great deal of research went into the provided links. The website creator, Lorine McGinnis Schulze, writes that she started the site in 1996 in order to provide free resources to other researchers.

The truth is, she delivers well on that promise. One of the more impressive links on the site are the ship passenger lists where you can search through the names of your ancestors who immigrated to the U.S. decades ago. Another very useful resource for anyone first starting out in genealogy is the “guide for beginners” that walks you through each step of finding your ancestors, and gives you the specific resources you should check out first in order to conduct that research.

7. GeneaBios – Reading about Life Stories

genealogy4

Ancestry research aside, if you’ve ever found yourself fascinated by the life story of someone who lived a hundred or more years before you were born – then this biography database should be your first stop. You can search through the database alphabetically or just search by specific name.

This database turns up a very long list of biographies written up by genealogy researchers who’ve conducted a thorough investigation and provide their results. Read about the person who built the old stone tavern in the middle of town, or the lives of the people who founded the community where you live.

The Top 10 Free Genealogy Websites to Find Your Ancestors

Without exaggerating, there are thousands of genealogy websites out there. MakeUseOf has touched on genealogy resources before – such as Mackenzie’s review of the GRAMPS software that lets you track your research, or Kinshuk’s review of the Kindo family tree building tool. When it comes to genealogy websites, they mostly all seem to be nothing more than lists of links to other resources.

Occasionally you’ll find a truly useful website with a search feature that accesses real data. For the purpose of this article, I will provide a list of the top 10 free genealogy websites that would be most valuable to anyone first entering into the hobby. These sites provide valuable tools, guides and access to databases that are overflowing with historic data.

genealogyThere are two things that mark KindredTrails as a “typical” genealogy website. The first is that there are links to Ancestry.com on almost every page. This seems like a sort of pandemic with genealogy sites.

Secondly, like most other ancestry sites, KindredTrails is very much a link-oriented site. However, it does make it onto the top ten list because the site is well designed, the links are well organized. Additionally, the links provided on this site are very useful and valuable.

9. Access Genealogy.com – A Great Mix of Research Resources

genealogy2Access Genealogy is up a notch from the typical ancestry website. Its main page is pleasantly clean and well organized. Along the left side you’ll find links to some of the most unique research sources including charts, links to old letters, military records, native american records and much more.

One of the more fascinating resources here are the transcribed cemetary records. There are researchers in every State around the U.S. that walk through the oldest cemetaries and actually transcribe names along with birthdates, date of death and family members. This resource alone will hold your interest for hours.

8. The Olive Tree – The Starting Point for Any Amateur Researcher

genealogy3

Olive Tree Genealogy is another private researcher’s website holding a collection of links and resources for historical data. One thing that sets this site apart from others is that it’s apparent a great deal of research went into the provided links. The website creator, Lorine McGinnis Schulze, writes that she started the site in 1996 in order to provide free resources to other researchers.

The truth is, she delivers well on that promise. One of the more impressive links on the site are the ship passenger lists where you can search through the names of your ancestors who immigrated to the U.S. decades ago. Another very useful resource for anyone first starting out in genealogy is the “guide for beginners” that walks you through each step of finding your ancestors, and gives you the specific resources you should check out first in order to conduct that research.

7. GeneaBios – Reading about Life Stories

genealogy4

Ancestry research aside, if you’ve ever found yourself fascinated by the life story of someone who lived a hundred or more years before you were born – then this biography database should be your first stop. You can search through the database alphabetically or just search by specific name.

This database turns up a very long list of biographies written up by genealogy researchers who’ve conducted a thorough investigation and provide their results. Read about the person who built the old stone tavern in the middle of town, or the lives of the people who founded the community where you live.

6. Family Tree Searcher – Online Quizzes to Help Your Research

genealogy5

The family tree searcher is another website created by a private researcher. This site is unique in that some of the resources are actually interactive quizzes that allow you to customize your research method.

One very useful quiz in particular is the “free advice” quiz, which asks you a series of questions about what you’re looking for, and at the end it provides you with a customized “research plan” along with the free resources that are most likely to help.

5. Genealogy Today – The Google of Ancestry

genealogy6

Of all privately created websites, this one is probably one of those that you could bookmark and use for all of your research needs. This site provides links to the usual resources like census data or death records.

What makes this site stand above the rest are the more creative sources offered, such as funeral cards, ration books, criminal records and even business cards. As many researchers know, the most successful results usually come from the more unorthodox methods.

4. U.S. National Archives – The Prime Source for U.S. Ancestry Information

genealogy7If you’re in the U.S. and you’re a historical researcher, the National Archives should be at the very top of your resource list. Eventually, most other websites end up linking to these resources anyway, so why not just start at the source?

This is where you’ll find census information, military records, immigration records, and even bankruptcy records. There are even articles and information on historical researching techniques.

3. U.K. National Archives – A Plethora of U.K. Historical Data

genealogy11The UK also has a valuable resource for history buffs in the form of its own National Archives website.  The main page of this website offers links to data such as births, marriage and deaths, census records, passenger lists and much more. European history is long, and these resources are unbelievably thorough and archived all the way back a thousand years.

On this website, you’ll also find valuable guides and articles on researching family and military history.

2. US GenWeb Project – The Top Source for U.S. Researchers

genealogy9

One of the largest and most valuable resources for historic information available to U.S. genealogy researchers is the USGenWeb project.

This project is made of up historical enthusiasts who actively volunteer their time and energy to provide free informationfor other researchers throughout the country. Just click on the State where you’re looking for information, and you’ll go directly to the State’s GenWeb site where the free resources for your community and local history are provided.

1. WorldGenWeb Project – World History Buffs Unite!

genealogy10

Once you get involved in genealogical research, the fastest thing that becomes apparent is that the hobby knows no borders. You’ll find expert researchers in just about every country from all around the world, and the best research available that brings all of these global enthusiasts together is the WorldGenWeb Project. This resource provides researchers with a safe place where they can focus on valuable and useful resources to conduct their research. Click on the country of your choice and eventually you can drill down to the specific community, and related free genealogy websites where you can hunt for more ancestral information.

Happy Birthday, Aunt Glady Serene Linderman Nelson


The Dubuque County Courthouse. This particular...
The Dubuque County Courthouse. This particular courthouse is an example of Beaux-Arts architecture. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)
Old Cable elevator
Old Cable elevator (Photo credit: Wikipedia)
Seal of the City of Dubuque, Iowa.
Seal of the City of Dubuque, Iowa. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

My Great Aunt Glady Serene Linderman Nelson would have been 106 years of age today. She always remembered our birthdays, even nieces and nephews, that she had never met. She never forgot to send a birthday card with a dime or quarter. She did not have much, but whatever she could send she would. It impressed on my little mind growing up, that someone all the way up in Dubuque, Iowa was thinking about me.

It made me feel special.

Besides the fact that we didn’t get much mail, and when a letter was just for me, it was exciting. Aunt Glady was a Proofreader for the Dubuque Telegraph Herald newspaper for years. She was the strong matriarch in the Nelson clan. She divorced and moved to the Linderman Home place at 705 West Third Street, Dubuque, Iowa with her widowed father. Glady cared for her father up until his death in 1968. Her father, Edward Francis Linderman and mother Gudrun Ivarra Lund Linderman had their home built in the 1900’s, and it still stands today. It is beautifully kept up.

My mother, Jean Marie Linderman Frederick Mancill and step dad, Louis Clifford Mancill took me and my brother Karl Thomas Frederick, and our cousin, Rebecca Sue Cooke Reeder Floyd to visit them in June 1970. We got to sleep in the attic. We rode the cable car, which terrified me to death. I was scared of heights and that car went straight down the mountain. Back then, children could walk to the store to pick up some things.

 

Me, Karl, and Rebecca “Becker” walked to the little store down the alley and bought some licorice and other treats. We were happy. A quarter used to buy a lot back then.

Dear Aunt Glady, you are gone but not forgotten. RIP Below is the memorial that I made for her.

Gladys Serene “Glady Serena” Linderman Nelson
 
Birth: Aug. 17, 1906
Winona
Winona County
Minnesota, USA
Death: Apr. 28, 1996
Houston
Harris County
Texas, USA

Daughter of Edward Francis “Edy” Linderman & Gudrun Ivarra “Gud” Lund Linderman, of Dubuque, Dubuque County, Iowa.
Baptized as Lutheran on November 11, 1906 in Winona, Minnesota. Gladys liked to be called Glady and preferred Serena instead of Serene.
Wife of Roy Leonard Nelson, Sr. They married in 1927 in Dubuque, Iowa.
Mother of Roy Leonard “Jimmy” Nelson Jr, Richard Edward”Dickie”, & Shirley Lorraine Nelson.
Glady & Roy Sr. were divorced.
Glady resided with her Father after her Mother died, and cared for him up until his death in 1968.
Great Aunt “Glady” worked as a Proofreader for the Dubuque newspaper, the Dubuque Telegraph Herald until she retired.
Then she sold the Linderman homestead at 705 W. Third Street, Dubuque, Iowa, and moved to California to be near her sister, Evelyn “Eppie” (Linderman) Ayala, and brother-in-law, Arturo “Art” Ayala.
Glady always remembered the nieces and nephews, and Great nieces and nephews on our birthdays. We could always count on getting a birthday card from her with some money in it. She couldn’t afford much, but we thought that a dime or a quarter was a lot of money, because back then in the 1960’s it was. It made me feel special–knowing that someone that I hardly knew–way off in Iowa, was thinking of me.
Great Aunt Glady resided with her son Roy “Jimmy” Leonard Nelson Jr., at 4045 Linkwood Drive, Houston, Harris County, Texas for the last few years of her life.
Cremated in Texas and ashes were brought back to Iowa and spread around Mother, Gudrun (Lund) Linderman’s gravesite, in Linwood Cemetery, Dubuque, Iowa, because that is how she wanted it. Her Father’s ashes were also spread around Gudrun’s gravesite.Family links:
Parents:
Edward Francis Linderman (1875 – 1968)
Gudrun Ivarra Lund Linderman (1881 – 1924)Spouse:
Roy Nelson (1899 – 1958)Children:
Shirley Loraine Nelson Ogle (1928 – 1982)*
Richard Edward Nelson (1933 – 2006)*
Burial:
Linwood Cemetery
Dubuque
Dubuque County
Iowa, USA 
 
Created by: TEXAS TUDORS
Record added: Aug 21, 2007
Find A Grave Memorial# 21069469
Gladys Serene Glady Serena <i>Linderman</i> Nelson
Added by: TEXAS TUDORS
Gladys Serene Glady Serena <i>Linderman</i> Nelson
Added by: TEXAS TUDORS
Gladys Serene Glady Serena <i>Linderman</i> Nelson
Added by: TEXAS TUDORS

My Maternal 3rd. Great Grandmother, Mary Holman Linderman, English Ancestor


 

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                       Mary Holman Linderman 

Birth: 1815
Montgomery
Orange County
New York, USA
Death: 1884
Winona
Winona County
Minnesota, USA

Mary Holman, was the daughter of John Holman of New York.
She married Abraham Linderman in 1833 in Crawford, Orange County, New York.
In 1856, they moved to Winona, Winona County, Minnesota. The old Linderman Home place was at: 231 E. Mark St., Winona, Winona County, Minnesota.
Mary & Abraham only had two children: Eliza Abraim & Mary Linderman.
The Linderman’s were Lutheran.
DEATH OF OLD SETTLERS
LINDERMAN
“Mary Linderman, wife of A. Linderman, died on the 7th. inst., at her home in this city in her 69th. year. As Mr. and Mrs. Linderman came to reside in Winona in April, 1856, her death takes another from the already diminshed list of old settlers. For the past year Mrs. Linderman has been a sufferer from the disease which finally terminated in dropsy and death, but had the unremitting attention of the members of her family and other kind friends. Mrs. Linderman was a woman of marked industry and force of character, and many can testify to her great kindness of heart. A large company of friends were present at the funeral and followed the remains to their resting place in Woodlawn Cemetery, Winona, Minnesota.”

Family links:
Spouse:
Abraham Linderman (1810 – 1893)*

Children:
Eliza Abraim Linderman (1843 – 1861)*
Mary Linderman (1859 – 1924)*

Burial:
Woodlawn Cemetery
Winona
Winona County
Minnesota, USA
Edit Virtual Cemetery info [?]
Created by: TEXAS TUDORS
Record added: Aug 21, 2007
Find A Grave Memorial# 21069161
Mary <i>Holman</i> Linderman
Added by: TEXAS TUDORS
Mary <i>Holman</i> Linderman
Added by: TEXAS TUDORS
Mary <i>Holman</i> Linderman
Added by: TEXAS TUDORS

What I Like About Texas


My Texas ancestors were: Frederick, Mazac, Konecny, Dudika, Volek, Marek, Ryland, Malusek, Cooke, Jackson, Levesque, etc…

My husband’s Texas ancestors were: Tudor, McCann, Mobley, Gillilan, Bishop, Hancock, etc…

The Claussens from Germany


Emma Elsie <i>Claussen</i> Palen

Emma Elsie Claussen Palen & daughter, Phylis Adele Palen, c. 1908, Caledonia, Minnesota. My Grandmother and Great Grandmother.

I just found out more information on my Great Grandmother’s family. She is the daughter of Henry Classen (Claussen) and Maria Classen from Germany.

The Census for 1870 for Illinois shows:

name: Henry Classen
estimated birth year: 1827
gender: Male
age in 1870: 43y
color (white, black, mulatto, chinese, indian): White
birthplace: Germany
home in 1870: Illinois, United States
Household Gender Age Birthplace
Henry Classen M 43y Germany
Maria Classen F 43y Germany
August Classen M 13y Illinois
Frederick Classen M 11y Illinois
Mina Classen F 9y Illinois
Caroline Classen F 7y Illinois
Emma Classen F 5y Illinois
Louisa Classen F 1y Illinois
Source Citation

United States Census, 1870,” index and images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.1.1/M6WY-NFY : accessed 10 Aug 2012), Henry Classen in household of Henry Classen, Illinois, United States; citing p. 4, family 26, NARA microfilm publication M593, FHL microfilm 545791.

It has taken me 25 years to find out who her parents were. I was so excited to find another link.

Emma Elsie (Claussen) Palen
Birth: Feb. 15, 1865
Monee
Will County
Illinois, USA
Death: Nov. 27, 1930
Dubuque
Dubuque County
Iowa, USA

Emma Elsie (Claussen) Palen, beloved first wife of Frank Joseph Palen, they married in 1885 in Caledonia, Houston County, Minnesota.
Mother of Phylis Adele Eugenia(Palen)Linderman, my Grandmother. I never knew my Great Grandmother, Emma because she died before I was born.
My Mother is Jean Marie (Linderman)Frederick Mancill, and she told me that Emma was Lutheran, but Frank was Catholic. And…that poor Emma had to attend her church alone, because she had promised to raise their children as Catholic.
My Grandmother wasn’t allowed to attend church with her Mother, and was forced to attend Catholic schools until she was in High School.
Phylis changed spelling of her name to Phyllis, and that she begged her Father to allow her to go to Public High School. He never forgave himself for it, because she married a Lutheran not a Catholic.
Through research, thanks to LeRoy Amacher, I found out that Frank and Emma were buried in the Mount Calvary Catholic Cemetery in Dubuque, Iowa, beside each other.
Emma was a good, loving, and kind woman. She was a homemaker.
Emma and Frank had four children Leo, Phylis, Hedwig, and Flossie Palen. Hedwig and Flossie died very young.
They have many, many descendants. They would be proud.
One of their daughters, my Grandmother, Phylis Adele (Palen) Linderman, and Harry William Linderman, had four daughters: Yvonne (Burgess Levesque), Yvarra “Billie” (Jackson), Jean Marie(Frederick Mancill), and Patricia Mae “Patsy” (Cooke), and no sons.Family links:
Spouse:
Frank Joseph Palen (1864 – 1953)*Children:
Leo Frank Palen (1890 – 1971)*
Phylis Eugenia Palen Linderman (1904 – 1963)*
Burial:
Mount Calvary Cemetery
Dubuque
Dubuque County
Iowa, USA
 
Created by: TEXAS TUDORS
Record added: Feb 29, 2008
Find A Grave Memorial# 24954456
Seal of Illinois. Center image extracted from ...
Seal of Illinois. Center image extracted from Illinois flag. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

The Palens from Luxembourg


 

 

Frank Joseph Palen

Frank Joseph Palen, and Great-Great Grandchildren, Mike Jackson, Paul & Bill Burgess, 1948, Dubuque, Iowa

 

Frank Joseph Palen

Emma Elsie (Claussen) Palen and daughter, Phylis Adele Palen, abt.1908, Dubuque, Iowa

 

 

Frank Joseph Palen
Birth: Dec. 6, 1864
Caledonia
Houston County
Minnesota, USA
Death: Dec., 1953
Dubuque
Dubuque County
Iowa, USA

My Maternal Great Grandfather, Frank Joseph Palen, son of Leopold Frank Palen & Mary (May) Haupert Palen, from Bachleiden, Luxembourg.
Husband of Emma Elsie (Claussen) Palen.
Father of Leo Frank, Phylis Adele (Linderman), Hedwig, and Flossie Palen.
Devout Catholic.
Resided at 1208 Jackson St. in Dubuque, Iowa.
Married second time to a widow, Ann Nason, who had one daughter (name unknown). Frank & Ann Nason Palen had no children together.
Frank Palen, attended a Catholic Church, there close to the River, the Cathedral of St. Raphael there on Bluff St, because that is where his Grandson, Robert Leon Palen, was ordained on 7 June 1941.
Frank Joseph & Emma Elsie (Claussen) Palen are buried beside each other in the Mount Calvary Cemetery, Dubuque, Iowa. Frank resided in Retirement Home near Mount Calvary Cemetery up until his death, because Ann had died before him. His home at 1208 Jackson Street was sold, when he married Ann Nason.
A world of thanks to LeRoy Amacher for taking the time to go and take this photo of Frank J. & Emma E. Palen’s headstone. I was soooo excited to see it for the first time!
Frank & Emma’s Granddaughter, my Mother, Jean Marie Linderman Frederick Mancill, is 84, and resides in Houston, Texas, Jan. 1, 2012.Family links:
Parents:
Leopold Frank Palen (1839 – 1909)
Mary Haupert Palen (1844 – 1937)Spouse:
Emma Elsie Claussen Palen (1865 – 1930)

Children:
Leo Frank Palen (1890 – 1971)*
Phylis Eugenia Palen Linderman (1904 – 1963)*

Burial:
Mount Calvary Cemetery
Dubuque
Dubuque County
Iowa, USA
Created by: TEXAS TUDORS
Record added: Feb 27, 2008
Find A Grave Memorial# 24932109


English Ancestors of Winona, Minnesota


Mary Holman Linderman
Birth: 1815
Montgomery
Orange County
New York, USA
Death: 1884
Winona
Winona County
Minnesota, USA

Mary Holman, was the daughter of John Holman of New York.
She married Abraham Linderman in 1833 in Crawford, Orange County, New York.
In 1856, they moved to Winona, Winona County, Minnesota. The old Linderman Home place was at: 231 E. Mark St., Winona, Winona County, Minnesota.
Mary & Abraham only had two children: Eliza Abraim & Mary Linderman.
The Linderman’s were Lutheran.
DEATH OF OLD SETTLERS
LINDERMAN
“Mary Linderman, wife of A. Linderman, died on the 7th. inst., at her home in this city in her 69th. year. As Mr. and Mrs. Linderman came to reside in Winona in April, 1856, her death takes another from the already diminshed list of old settlers. For the past year Mrs. Linderman has been a sufferer from the disease which finally terminated in dropsy and death, but had the unremitting attention of the members of her family and other kind friends. Mrs. Linderman was a woman of marked industry and force of character, and many can testify to her great kindness of heart. A large company of friends were present at the funeral and followed the remains to their resting place in Woodlawn Cemetery, Winona, Minnesota.”
Family links:
Spouse:
Abraham Linderman (1810 – 1893)*

Children:
Eliza Abraim Linderman (1843 – 1861)*
Mary Linderman (1859 – 1924)*

Burial:
Woodlawn Cemetery
Winona
Winona County
Minnesota, USA
Created by: TEXAS TUDORS
Record added: Aug 21, 2007
Find A Grave Memorial# 21069161
Mary <i>Holman</i> Linderman
Added by: TEXAS TUDORS
Mary <i>Holman</i> Linderman
Added by: TEXAS TUDORS
Mary <i>Holman</i> Linderman

Germans in Winona, Minnesota


Mary Linderman
Birth: 1859
Bemidji, Clearwater County
Minnesota, USA
Death: May 8, 1924
Dubuque
Dubuque County
Iowa, USA

Only daughter of Abraham & Mary (Hammell) Linderman of Winona, Minnesota.
Linderman homestead was at 231 E. Mark St., Winona, Winona County, Minnesota.
Mother of one child, Edward Francis Linderman, of Dubuque,Dubuque County, Iowa.
Never married (it was a deep, dark secret up until 1995.)
Grandmother of Harry, Gladys, Irene, and Evelyn Linderman.

Her parents, Abraham and Mary (Hammell) Linderman at 231 E. Mark St., Winona, Minnesota up until 1913, when they sold the house and moved in with her son whom had built a new home in Dubuque, Iowa.
Resided with son, Edy, and daughter-in-law, Gud, at 705 W. Third St., Dubuque, Iowa until her death in 1924.
Mary was dedicated to her family, and they had a very close knit family.
Mary was buried at the Woodlawn Cemetery, Winona, Minnesota near her parents, Abraham & Mary (Hammell) Linderman, in the LINDERMAN Family Plot.
The cemetery plot map shows Mary buried next to her parents, Abraham & Mary Linderman, in the Linderman family plot. There is no headstone for her. There was just one big grave marker with an urn on it for flowers, and the name “LINDERMAN” on it.

Cousin, Roy Nelson Jr. photographed it in 1996.
All that exists of it now is a piece of stone with LINDERMAN on it.
Her Mother’s headstone just states “MOTHER” on it.
Their is also a headstone in the “Linderman” family plot for a “BABY”, which in the cemetery records just shows George Bigelow. There was a Bigelow, that worked as a handyman for the E.F. Linderman family at 705 W. Third St, Dubuque, Iowa. My Mother has told me that he helped my Great-Grandfather with his four children, when his Mother, Mary, died in May 1924, and his dear beloved, wife, Gud [Lund] Linderman also died one month later in June 1924.

Family links:
Parents:
Abraham Linderman (1810 – 1893)
Mary Hammell Linderman (1815 – 1884)

Children:
Edward Francis Linderman (1875 – 1968)

 
Burial:
Woodlawn Cemetery
Winona
Winona County
Minnesota, USA
Plot: 35
 
Created by: TEXAS TUDORS
Record added: Aug 21, 2007
Find A Grave Memorial# 21069240
Mary Linderman
Added by: TEXAS TUDORS
Mary Linderman

LeRoy Eugene Frederick & Barbara Jo (Moore) Faulk Frederick



“Services for LeRoy Eugene Frederick, 80, of Grapeland, Texas will be at 1 p.m. Monday at Liberty Hill United Methodist Church with Tommy Hutto officiating. Burial will follow in Augusta Cemetery under the direction of Bailey & Foster, Grapeland. Mr. Frederick died Thursday at East Texas Medical Center in Crockett. Condolence calls will be from 6 to 8 p.m. Sunday at Bailey & Foster Funeral Home,Grapeland, Texas.”


My Daddy helped build the Liberty Hill Methodist Church.
Leroy was the son of Charlie & Bessie (Mazac) Frederick of Crosby, Harris County, Texas. Leroy’s ancestors emigrated from Moravia in June 1892. He had two sisters, Agnes Frederick Christ and Juanita Frederick Christ, both of Houston, Harris County, Texas. He had two brothers, Charles and Woodrow Frederick, who preceded him in death.
He was married to Jean Linderman 15 Nov. 1947. They had six children by that union, which lasted for twenty one years. Joseph, Phyllis [Hyden], Sally [Tudor], Karl, Patricia [Harrod], and Sarah Frederick [Moore]. Divorced in 1968.
“Lee” married Barbara Moore Faulk on 15 Sept. 1969. Barabara had two children, Jeanna and Joey Faulk, from a previous marriage. Lee & Barbara had no children from that union, which lasted for thirty seven years.
LeRoy served in the U.S. Navy during World War II aboard Merchant Marine supply ships for troops. He served in the U.S. Navy from Jan. 1944, until May 18, 1946. He was shipped out from San Diego, California. Frederick, Leroy Eugene Frederick, his service number was 5772117, Seaman 1C, V-6 USNR, resided in Sheldon, Texas. He was Honorably discharged. He was sent back to Camp Wallace, Texas after World War II ended.
Daddy worked for Brown & Root, Inc, 4100 Clinton Drive, Houston, Texas for [46] forty six years. Started out as a Mechanic and retired as Asst. Supt. of the Automotive Dept.
Lee & Barbara (Moore) Frederick were camp hosts for years in South Dakota, Montana, Wyoming, etc… In 1995, all the Grandchildren were taken by son, Joseph Frederick & Brenda (Meyers)Frederick, to visit them in South Dakota, Wyoming, & Montana.
Leroy was a loving Son, Husband, Father, Grandfather, and Great-Grandfather. He was dearly loved and is greatly missed.